Have you heard of Sneaky Cards? The game is turning everyday life into quite an adventure.

There are people out there putting money in vending machines and then quickly walking away. On purpose.

This one told me to prepay for a vending machine snack. Done! 2/55 #playitforward
A photo posted by Gripp... Plays It Forward (@gripp.plays.it.forward) on

Others are asking strangers to cut in front of them in line.

It's all part of the game.

Let this person cut me in line at the very busy supermarket. Interacting with strangers is nerve-wracking. 3/55 #playitforward
A photo posted by Gripp... Plays It Forward (@gripp.plays.it.forward) on

"Sneaky Cards: Play It Forward" is a new card game that's the ultimate reminder that random daily moments and interactions with strangers can be a lot of fun.




Image via Sneaky Cards.

It's the ultimate way to mix up your day and challenge yourself.

Sometimes you interact with people, sometimes you do a nice thing, sometimes you make art.

You may have to find someone who provided great service, and then give them an extra-nice tip.

Or you may have to approach the first person who makes you smile and give them the card that tells them so.

Or maybe you have to give someone a card without them even knowing you gave it to them!

Sometimes you gotta be sneaky. That's how Sneaky Cards works.

One part sneaky, one part delightful happiness.

And because you can register your cards online before you play, you get to track where in the city, state, country — or world! — your completed cards end up.

Map via Sneaky Cards.

You never know if the person you gave a card to at that coffee shop will pass it on to someone else, or rather, play it forward, and register it online. But you'll get an email alert if they do. Because ... Internet coolness!

The game has come a long way. It was originally based on a winning concept in 2009 by then-16-year-old Harry Lee and later brought to life by game developer Cody Borst. It's starting to roll out for purchase to the masses, but you can still download the free version and cut out your own cards too.


It's a game that turns everyday life into a game of sharing fun and happiness.

We get into our day-to-day grind and it can get so boring and repetitive that we barely look up to see what's actually going on around us. A game like Sneaky Cards can definitely make your day more interesting or enhance a conference or party that's already awkward to begin with. Might as well mix it up!

It's fun to get excited and be pulled out of your comfort zone sometimes — not to mention be surprised with random acts of kindness.

I think Sneaky Cards does all those things quite beautifully and can even make for a good story (or several of them).


Nothing will take you out of your comfort zone faster than asking a stranger to take a selfie with you.

I know because I did it. Whew!

Getting to know one another (and ourselves!) helps to expand our minds and be our very best. It may even make someone's day. I'm so into it.

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Shanda Lynn Poitra was born and raised on the Turtle Mountain Reservation in Belcourt, North Dakota. She lived there until she was 24 years old when she left for college at the University of North Dakota in Grand Forks.

"Unfortunately," she says, "I took my bad relationship with me. At the time, I didn't realize it was so bad, much less, abusive. Seeing and hearing about abusive relationships while growing up gave me the mentality that it was just a normal way of life."

Those college years away from home were difficult for a lot of reasons. She had three small children — two in diapers, one in elementary school — as well as a full-time University class schedule and a part-time job as a housekeeper.

"I wore many masks back then and clothing that would cover the bruises," she remembers. "Despite the darkness that I was living in, I was a great student; I knew that no matter what, I HAD to succeed. I knew there was more to my future than what I was living, so I kept working hard."

While searching for an elective class during this time, she came across a one-credit, 20-hour IMPACT self-defense class that could be done over a weekend. That single credit changed her life forever. It helped give her the confidence to leave her abusive relationship and inspired her to bring IMPACT classes to other Native women in her community.

I walked into class on a Friday thinking that I would simply learn how to handle a person trying to rob me, and I walked out on a Sunday evening with a voice so powerful that I could handle the most passive attacks to my being, along with physical attacks."

It didn't take long for her to notice the difference the class was making in her life.

"I was setting boundaries and people were either respecting them or not, but I was able to acknowledge who was worth keeping in my life and who wasn't," she says.

Following the class, she also joined a roller derby league where she met many other powerful women who inspired her — and during that summer, she found the courage to leave her abuser.

"As afraid as I was, I finally had the courage to report the abuse to legal authorities, and I had the support of friends and family who provided comfort for my children and I during this time," she says.

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One little girl took pictures of her school lunches. The Internet responded — and so did the school.

If you listened to traditional news media (and sometimes social media), you'd begin to think the Internet and technology are bad for kids. Or kids are bad for technology. Here's a fascinating alternative idea.

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This article originally appeared on 03.31.15

Kids can innovate, create, and imagine in ways that are fresh and inspiring — when we "allow" them to do so, anyway. Despite the tendency for parents to freak out because their kids are spending more and more time with technology in schools, and the tendency for schools themselves to set extremely restrictive limits on the usage of such technology, there's a solid argument for letting them be free to imagine and then make it happen.

It's not a stretch to say the kids in this video are on the cutting edge. Some of the results he talks about in the video at the bottom are quite impressive.

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