Google announces new plan that will let people get great tech jobs without a college degree
Photo by Jasmine Coro on Unsplash

Do you remember having to take a college course in something like Elizabethan poetry and wondering how this will ever be applicable in real life? Perhaps while taking algebra you were wondering how important finding X really was. Google may agree with you.

The tech juggernaut has just announced a series of courses designed to teach students the specific skills that todays forward-thinking companies are looking for. Each course takes about six months and offers "Google Career Certificates" upon completion. The cost is unclear but is expected to be around $50/month for each course. While Google could benefit from training potential employees in the ways of their infrastructure for a seamless transition into the company, they also have access to the top of the talent pool. Regardless of any advantage Google is trying to gain by putting forth such a program, this streamlined approach to education feels like a long overdue step towards education reform.




Photo by Mitchell Luo on


As if to clear up any confusion, Googles senior vice president of global affairs tweeted on July 13th "In our own hiring, we will now treat these new career certificates as the equivalent of a four-year degree for related roles."

Of course, there is much to be gained from learning the problem solving skills of calculous, or the obtaining the knowledge of old school philosophers who have already done the heavy lifting. However, for those who cant afford (or justify) $65,000 a year on a traditional college education, Google is offering their own version of education reform. "College degrees are out of reach for many Americans, and you shouldn't need a college diploma to have economic security," writes Kent Walker, senior vice president of global affairs at Google. "We need new, accessible job-training solutions--from enhanced vocational programs to online education--to help America recover and rebuild."

It is almost as if Google has figured out that people don't want to bundle their education any more than they want to bundle their internet, cable and phone. In todays rapidly evolving environment, landlines are no longer considered the necessity they once were. While studying romance languages and literatures at an Ivy League University might be fulfilling and character shaping, that knowledge might not translate to an immediate hire at a tech company. As the financial class gap continues to widen, so grows the demographic of the population that doesn't have the luxury to overpay for the educational prestige of a name on their resume. Most musicians know that while some guitars are built better than others, the jump in price does not correlate to the increase in quality. It is simply about the headstock. If Google is a musical group, they sure arent teaching people how to read sheet music. It seems they might have only two concerns: can you rock, and can we rock together.

Lainey and baby goat Annie. Photo courtesy of Lainey Morse
True

Oftentimes, the journey to our true calling is winding and unexpected. Take Lainey Morse, who went from office manager to creator of the viral trend, Goat Yoga, thanks to her natural affinity for goats and throwing parties.

Back in 2015, Lainey bought a farm in Oregon and got her first goats who she named Ansel and Adams. "Once I got them, I was obsessed," says Lainey. "It was hard to get me off the farm to go do anything else."

Right away, she noticed what a calming presence they had. "Even the way they chew their cud is relaxing to be around because it's very methodical," she says. Lainey was going through a divorce and dealing with a rheumatoid arthritis diagnosis at the time, but even when things got particularly hard, the goats provided relief.

"I found it impossible to be stressed or depressed when I was with them."

She started inviting friends up to the farm for what she called "Goat Happy Hour." Soon, the word spread about Lainey's delightful, stress-relieving furry friends. At one point, she auctioned off a child's birthday party at her farm, and the mom asked if they could do yoga with the goats. And lo, the idea for goat yoga was born.

A baby goat on a yoga student. Photo courtesy of Lainey Morse

Goat yoga went viral so much so that by fall of 2016, Lainey was able to quit her office manager job at a remodeling company to manage her burgeoning goat yoga business full-time. Now she has 10 locations nationwide.

Lainey handles the backend management for all of her locations, and loves that side of the business too, even though it's less goat-related. "I still have my own personal Goat Happy Hour every single day so I still get to spend a lot of time with my goats," says Lainey. "I get the best of both worlds."

Lainey with her goat Fabio. Photo courtesy of Lainey Morse

Since COVID-19 hit, her locations have had to close temporarily. She hopes her yoga locations will be able to resume classes in the spring when the vaccine is more widely available. "I think people will need goat yoga more than ever before, because everyone has been through so much stress in 2020," says Lainey.

Major life changes like Lainey's can come around for any number of reasons. Even if they seem out of left field to some, it doesn't mean they're not the right moves for you. The new FOX series "Call Me Kat", which premieres Sunday, January 3rd after NFL and will continue on Thursday nights beginning January 7th, exemplifies that. The show is centered around Kat, a 39-year old single woman played by Mayim Bialik, who quit her math professor job and spent her life's savings to pursue her dreams to open a Cat Café in Louisville, Kentucky.

Jeff Harry started making similar moves when he was just 10-years-old, and kept making them throughout his life. After seeing the movie "Big,"Jeff knew he wanted to play with toys for a living, so he started writing toy companies asking for next steps. He finally got a response when he was a sophomore in high school — the company told him he needed to become a mechanical engineer first.

Keep Reading Show less
via Riley / Twitter

Remember when Donald Trump was best known as the quintessential obnoxious rich New Yorker? That's what made him a household name and he played the role perfectly.

Even if ten years ago, you said that the guy who fired Gary Busey on "The Apprentice" would eventually direct a mob of thousands to overthrow the U.S. government, no one would believe you.

Alas, it's 2021 and the public perception of Donald Trump has changed quite a bit. So his cameo in 1992's "Home Alone 2: Lost in New York" is a little jarring these days.

Keep Reading Show less
Photo by Anna Shvets from Pexels
True

Increasingly customers are looking for more conscious shopping options. According to a Nielsen survey in 2018, nearly half (48%) of U.S. consumers say they would definitely or probably change their consumption habits to reduce their impact on the environment.

But while many consumers are interested in spending their money on products that are more sustainable, few actually follow through. An article in the 2019 issue of Harvard Business Review revealed that 65% of consumers said they want to buy purpose-driven brands that advocate sustainability, but only about 26% actually do so. It's unclear where this intention gap comes from, but thankfully it's getting more convenient to shop sustainably from many of the retailers you already support.

Amazon recently introduced Climate Pledge Friendly, "a new program to help make it easy for customers to discover and shop for more sustainable products." When you're browsing Amazon, a Climate Pledge Friendly label will appear on more than 45,000 products to signify they have one or more different sustainability certifications which "help preserve the natural world, reducing the carbon footprint of shipments to customers," according to the online retailer.

Amazon

In order to distinguish more sustainable products, the program partnered with a wide range of external certifications, including governmental agencies, non-profits, and independent laboratories, all of which have a focus on preserving the natural world.

Keep Reading Show less

A week after learning she was pregnant with twins, TikTok user @theblondebunny1 and her fiancé, got the stunning news she was pregnant again. And, no it wasn't because the doctor missed a kid when they did the first count.

She was impregnated again ten days after the first embryos took hold. How in the world did that happen?

This pregnancy is known as superfetation and according to Healthline, it's so rare that there are only a few cases noted in medical literature.

Keep Reading Show less

In October, the Washington Post shared an updated count of the lies or misleading claims President Trump has made since he was elected. The count, as of August 27, was 22,247 claims in 1,316 days. Why did the count only go through August? Because the president's pace had accelerated to more than 50 lies or misleading claims per day, and the fact-checking team couldn't keep up.

And it's not just the Washington Post. Fact checkers across the media landscape have repeatedly lamented that it's impossible to keep up.

All politicians stretch the truth sometimes, some more often or egregiously than others. But the frequency, nature, and shamelessness of President Trump's lying is in an entirely separate category than most politicians. This is not an opinion or even a judgment; it's an axiomatic fact.

The problem is, a shocking number of people overlook his lies, believe his lies, or in some cases, even love his lies. Opportunistic politicians and idealogues have seen him rise to power through lies, have seen the adulation he receives from his base for his lies, and have decided it's worth it to hitch their wagon to his lies. That's largely how we've ended up here, in a broken government and political culture where the president's supporters rally behind the lie that he won the election with a not-insignificant number of them willing to die or kill to defend that lie.

Keep Reading Show less