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A recurring theme in 2015 has been "seeing is believing" — especially for girls.

It's easier to believe you can do something when you've seen someone else do it. That's why no matter how frustrated you get assembling IKEA furniture, you have to believe in those instructions. You saw it put together in the store. You know it can be done!

2015 has been marked with some major "seeing is believing" milestones of its own. From comedy to politics to sports to engineering, many women have taken the status quo and said, "ehhh … let's try it my way instead."


These women are helping to shift perceptions on what women and girls are capable of, and they're inspiring a whole generation while they're at it.

Could she be the next RBG? Maybe! Image of Ginsburg from Steve Petteway/Wikimedia Commons. Image of future-Ginsburg via GoldieBlox/YouTube.

In a new music video, girls step into the shoes of 10 of today's top female role models.

The video comes from popular toy company GoldieBlox and features mini-superstars like Sophia Grace, Heaven King, Jillian from EvanTubeHD, Sam Gordon, RadioJH Audrey, Annie and Hayley from Bratayley, and Flippin' Katie.

Their message is simple: Girls can run on the field and run the world. They can do whatever they want to do. And right now they've got some badass women to show them how.

For instance, in 2015, Viola Davis became the first black woman to win an Emmy for lead actress in a drama series, showing millions of girls around the world that they could too.

GIF via GoldieBlox/YouTube.

And the on-point message Davis delivered gave when accepting her award says it all:

GIF from "67th Emmy Awards/Fox."

Remember when Misty Copeland became the first ever black principal ballerina at the American Ballet Theatre this year? Yeah, that was rad.

And now it seems more possible than ever before that any girl, no matter the color of her skin, can be next.

Shattering the ceiling in her ballet shoes. (Hello, Heaven King!) GIF via GoldieBlox/YouTube.

A woman who needs no introduction, Hillary Clinton is no stranger to the spotlight. She shows time and time again that it's cool to stand up for what you believe in and, oh yeah, run for PRESIDENT!

The more girls see that politics isn't just a "boys only" club, the more likely they are to go for it.

We need more amazing lady power suits in office. GIF via GoldieBlox/YouTube.

And let's not forget Amy Schumer, who has proven that you can find hilarious ways to talk about issues that matter, like equal pay and sexual double standards.

Her "Girl, you don't need makeup" sketch was gold.

You can show how smart you are AND be funny. Go get 'em, girls. GIF via GoldieBlox/YouTube.

So many industries today are male-dominated, and the idea that 'you can't be what you can't see' hits home with women of all ages. It's refreshing to see that beginning to change.

How are you supposed to think you can become a female NFL coach if you only see men on the job? A woman named Jenn Welter made it happen this year. Now, who will be the next?

Slowly but surely, the tide is turning.

GoldieBlox and organizations like The Representation Project are helping to make it happen by shining a light on the need for positive women role models in the media and showing that there is more for girls outside of the stereotypical pink aisle at the department store.

It's working. Bring on 2016.

You can watch GoldieBlox's music video celebrating some of this year's women superstars and their mini-me's here:

Joy

Nurse turns inappropriate things men say in the delivery room into ‘inspirational’ art

"Can you move to the birthing ball so I can sleep in the bed?"

Holly the delivery nurse.

After working six years as a labor and delivery nurse Holly, 30, has heard a lot of inappropriate remarks made by men while their partners are in labor. “Sometimes the moms think it’s funny—and if they think it’s funny, then I’ll laugh with them,” Holly told TODAY Parents. “But if they get upset, I’ll try to be the buffer. I’ll change the subject.”

Some of the comments are so wrong that she did something creative with them by turning them into “inspirational” quotes and setting them to “A Thousand Miles” by Vanessa Carlton on TikTok.

“Some partners are hard to live up to!” she jokingly captioned the video.

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All images provided by Adewole Adamson

It begins with more inclusive conversations at a patient level

True

Adewole Adamson, MD, of the University of Texas, Austin, aims to create more equity in health care by gathering data from more diverse populations by using artificial intelligence (AI), a type of machine learning. Dr. Adamson’s work is funded by the American Cancer Society (ACS), an organization committed to advancing health equity through research priorities, programs and services for groups who have been marginalized.

Melanoma became a particular focus for Dr. Adamson after meeting Avery Smith, who lost his wife—a Black woman—to the deadly disease.

melanoma,  melanoma for dark skin Avery Smith (left) and Adamson (sidenote)

This personal encounter, coupled with multiple conversations with Black dermatology patients, drove Dr. Adamson to a concerning discovery: as advanced as AI is at detecting possible skin cancers, it is heavily biased.

To understand this bias, it helps to first know how AI works in the early detection of skin cancer, which Dr. Adamson explains in his paper for the New England Journal of Medicine (paywall). The process uses computers that rely on sets of accumulated data to learn what healthy or unhealthy skin looks like and then create an algorithm to predict diagnoses based on those data sets.

This process, known as supervised learning, could lead to huge benefits in preventive care.

After all, early detection is key to better outcomes. The problem is that the data sets don’t include enough information about darker skin tones. As Adamson put it, “everything is viewed through a ‘white lens.’”

“If you don’t teach the algorithm with a diverse set of images, then that algorithm won’t work out in the public that is diverse,” writes Adamson in a study he co-wrote with Smith (according to a story in The Atlantic). “So there’s risk, then, for people with skin of color to fall through the cracks.”

Tragically, Smith’s wife was diagnosed with melanoma too late and paid the ultimate price for it. And she was not an anomaly—though the disease is more common for White patients, Black cancer patients are far more likely to be diagnosed at later stages, causing a notable disparity in survival rates between non-Hispanics whites (90%) and non-Hispanic blacks (66%).

As a computer scientist, Smith suspected this racial bias and reached out to Adamson, hoping a Black dermatologist would have more diverse data sets. Though Adamson didn’t have what Smith was initially looking for, this realization ignited a personal mission to investigate and reduce disparities.

Now, Adamson uses the knowledge gained through his years of research to help advance the fight for health equity. To him, that means not only gaining a wider array of data sets, but also having more conversations with patients to understand how socioeconomic status impacts the level and efficiency of care.

“At the end of the day, what matters most is how we help patients at the patient level,” Adamson told Upworthy. “And how can you do that without knowing exactly what barriers they face?”

american cancer society, skin cacner treatment"What matters most is how we help patients at the patient level."https://www.kellydavidsonstudio.com/

The American Cancer Society believes everyone deserves a fair and just opportunity to prevent, find, treat, and survive cancer—regardless of how much money they make, the color of their skin, their sexual orientation, gender identity, their disability status, or where they live. Inclusive tools and resources on the Health Equity section of their website can be found here. For more information about skin cancer, visit cancer.org/skincancer.

The mesmerizing lost art of darning knit fabric.

For most of human history, people had to make their own clothing by hand, and sewing skills were subsequently passed down from generation to generation. Because clothing was so time-consuming and labor-intensive to make, people also had to know how to repair clothing items that got torn or damaged in some way.

The invention of sewing and knitting machines changed the way we acquire clothing, and the skills people used to possess have largely gone by the wayside. If we get a hole in a sock nowadays, we toss it and replace it. Most of us have no idea how to darn a sock or fix a hole in any knit fabric. It's far easier for us to replace than to repair.

But there are still some among us who do have the skills to repair clothing in a way that makes it look like the rip, tear or hole never happened, and to watch them do it is mesmerizing.

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Pop Culture

Artist uses AI to create ultra realistic portraits of celebrities who left us too soon

What would certain icons look like if nothing had happened to them?

Mercury would be 76 today.

Some icons have truly left this world too early. It’s a tragedy when anyone doesn’t make it to see old age, but when it happens to a well-known public figure, it’s like a bit of their art and legacy dies with them. What might Freddie Mercury have created if he were granted the gift of long life? Bruce Lee? Princess Diana?

Their futures might be mere musings of our imagination, but thanks to a lot of creativity (and a little tech) we can now get a glimpse into what these celebrities might have looked like when they were older.

Alper Yesiltas, an Istanbul-based lawyer and photographer, created a photography series titled “As If Nothing Happened,” which features eerily realistic portraits of long gone celebrities in their golden years. To make the images as real looking as possible, Yesiltas incorporated various photo editing programs such as Adobe Lightroom and VSCO, as well as the AI photo-enhancing software Remini.

“The hardest part of the creative process for me is making the image feel ‘real’ to me,” Yesiltas wrote about his passion project. “The moment I like the most is when I think the image in front of me looks as if it was taken by a photographer.”

Yesiltas’ meticulousness paid off, because the results are uncanny.

Along with each photo, Yesiltas writes a bittersweet message “wishing” how things might have gone differently … as if nothing happened.
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