Viola Davis made history and spoke out about inequality in her stirring Emmy acceptance speech.

'You cannot win an Emmy for roles that are simply not there.'

At the 2015 Emmy Awards, Viola Davis made history by taking home the award for best actress in a drama series.

The "How to Get Away with Murder" star became the first black woman to win best actress in a drama and used the opportunity to speak out about inequality in Hollywood.


She began by quoting Harriet Tubman.


"'In my mind I see a line, and over that line, I see green fields and lovely flowers and beautiful white women with their arms stretched out to me over that line, but I can't seem to get there no how,'" she began her speech. "'I can't seem to get over that line.' That was Harriet Tubman in the 1800s."

"The only thing that separates women of color from anyone else is opportunity."

Her next words extend far beyond the world of acting, pointing to an issue affecting women of color in all fields: opportunity. For many, it's simply not there.

GIFs from the 67th annual Emmy Awards.

And she's right. History shows that women of color simply don't get the types of opportunities white women do.

New Yorker TV critic Emily Nussbaum pointed out that before 2012, it had been decades since a black woman starred as the lead in a network TV drama.


Davis closed with a nod to writers and others who push back on stereotypes and beauty standards.

Photo by Kevin Winter/Getty Images.

The speech was quickly hailed as one of the best in recent awards show history.

Celebrities like Oprah weighed in.

Joining her were women like "Scandal" star Kerry Washington,

"Selma" director Ava DuVernay,


and "Scandal," "How to Get Away with Murder," and "Grey's Anatomy" creator Shonda Rhimes.


Congratulations, Viola Davis!

More
via The Gubbio Project

Recent estimates show that there are around 550,00 people who are unhoused on any given night in America. A large percentage of those who find their way to shelters are helped by faith-based organizations.

Forty-one percent of the emergency shelter beds for adults and around 16% of those for families are provided by such groups.

For the past 15 years, the St. Boniface Catholic Church in San Francisco, California has taken The Bible's teachings to heart by alllowing the unhoused sleep in its pews as part of an outreach program called the Gubbio Project.

Keep Reading Show less
Well Being

One of the most major breakthroughs in preventing the spread of illnesses and infections in hospitals was embarrassingly simple. Wash your hands. In 1846, Hungarian physician Ignaz Semmelweis discovered that hand washing played a vital role in the spread of germs, and the practice soon became mandatory in hospitals. The simple act of scrubbing hands with soap and water literally saved lives.

Getting a kid to wash their hands, however, can be an uphill battle. One teacher did a simple experiment to show her students just how important hand washing is.

Keep Reading Show less
Instagram / Jameela Jamil

Being a celebrity must suck, because you can't talk about personal decisions without everyone feeling they need to have their say. However, some celebrities just don't care what the haters think and are going to live their lives how they see fit. Nobody does it better than actress and activist Jameela Jamil.

Earlier this year, Jamil revealed she had an abortion seven years ago. "I had an abortion when I was young, and it was the best decision I have ever made. Both for me, and for the baby I didn't want, and wasn't ready for, emotionally, psychologically and financially. So many children will end up in foster homes. So many lives ruined. So very cruel," she wrote on Twitter. Jamil decided to reveal her abortion after Georgia's controversial fetal heartbeat abortion law was passed.

RELATED: Jameela Jamil wants women to stop apologizing for 'being ambitious'

Now, Jamil says she's living her best life, because her decision was not a "mistake" – even if other people see it that way.

"Receiving THOUSANDS of messages about how I made a mistake having an abortion 7 years ago and how I must be a miserable person. I am in fact a happy, thriving multi millionaire, madly in love, with free time, good sleep and a wonderful career and life. But thanks for checking," the "Good Place" actress wrote on Twitter.

Keep Reading Show less
popular
via @ResistMoveTRM / Twitter

The number of people dying from drug overdoses in the U.S. is staggering. In 2017, 70,237 people died from drug overdoses, 47,600 of those were from opioids.

According to the CDC, that number has increased over five times since 1999. Since 2011, an alarming number of opioid deaths have been caused by fentanyl, a highly potent synthetic opioid.

Keep Reading Show less
popular