Everyone loves this two-year-old's reaction to seeing Bruce Banner become the Hulk
via Hose OK / Twitter and Paddyy Raff / Twitter

There are some moments in life you can never get back. Seeing the twist in "The Empire Strikes Back." Meeting your husband or wife for the first time. The first time you rode a roller coaster.

With the advent of social media, parents have been taking video of their children watching pivotal moments in pop culture to share their reactions. Irish comedian Paddy Raff filmed his two-year-old daughter, Clara's reaction where she saw Bruce Banner turn into the Hulk for the first time.


And we all know what happens when he becomes the Hulk, right? He smashes everything in sight.

The video was tweeted out on Wednesday, October 9, and it already has over 300,000 likes. According to Clara's dad, the movie was either 2012's "The Avengers" 2015's "Avengers: Age of Ultron."

He's unsure because his son was in charge of the remote control when the video was taken.

There are four elements that make this video adorable:

1. The way she wags her finger at the Hulk for being naughty and chastises him, "No!"

2. The Spider-man figure that's beside her as she watches the movie.

3. The way she moves between being enthralled by the movie but still has the presence of mind to keep eating.

4. Then there's the big look of pure shock.

via Paddy Raff / Twitter

The video is so cute that it even grabbed the attention of the man who plays Banner, Mark Ruffalo.

The Avengers are a big thing in this family. Clara loves playing with her brother's figures and feeds them breakfast when he goes to school.

RELATED: Student aces her ninja history essay by turning in a deceptively 'blank sheet of paper'

The video has inspired some great responses on Twitter.


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