Examples of human awesomeness during a global crisis is the shot of hope we all need

These are extraordinary times.

The coronavirus pandemic is pulling us through a common global experience, the likes of which none of us has seen before. And frankly, it's a little unnerving. The mad dash to get everyone on the social distancing wagon quickly enough to "flatten the curve," the swiftness with which our daily lives have been altered, and the uncertainty of what the coming weeks and months will bring has all of us feeling on edge.

But extraordinary times also bring our humanity. While some people don't handle crisis well (please stop panic-hoarding guns, America) there are countless examples of the best in people shining through the darkness. As we look toward the countries that have been hit the hardest so far, we can see these beacons of light as sources of hope.


Upworthy's Instagram shares nothing but the best of humanity, and during this pandemic, these stories and snippets are just the balm we all need.

For instance, this fitness instructor in Spain offering energetic, social-distance-friendly workouts from a rooftop:

And this landlord helping out tenants who are working in the food and retail industries:

How about these doctors and nurses in Iran keeping their spirits up by dancing together? (Doctors and nurses in hard-hit areas like Iran are working long hours and risking their lives in the process. They deserve alllll the kudos.)

Check out these folks in Italy, where a nation-wide quarantine has people confined to their homes, "sharing" a meal with one another from their balconies. Buon appetito!!

Sometimes hope comes from unexpected places, such as this garbageman who offered exactly the sweet words of hope and resilience we all need to hear right now:

"I'm a garbageman, I can't work from home and my job is an essential city service that must get done. it's a tough job, from getting up pre-dawn to the physical toll it takes on my body to the monotonous nature of the job, at times it's hard to keep going.

Right now though, right now I am feeling an extra sense of pride and purpose as I do my work. I see the people, my people, of my city, peeking out their windows at me. They're scared, we're scared. Scared but resilient.

Us garbagemen are gonna keep collecting the garbage, doctors and nurses are gonna keep doctoring and nurse-ering. It's gonna be ok, we're gonna make it be ok. I love my city. I love my country. I love my planet Earth. Be good to each other and we'll get through this."

And this round of applause for healthcare workers in Spain will definitely bring a lump to your throat.

So many stories of individuals stepping up to help out people who are taking a big financial hit from the measures being taken to slow the spread of the virus—truly the best of humanity coming out right now.



While we need to stay informed of what's happening, we also need a respite from the heaviness of the news. Uplifting stories can help us maintain a sense of calm through the crisis and hope through the havoc we're all experiencing, so if you're looking for where to go for such stories, Upworthy on Instagram has your back.

We're all in this together. Let's keep the bright spots in our sights.

Photo by Maxim Hopman on Unsplash

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Any time conversations about wealth and poverty come up, people inevitably start talking about boots.

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via PixaBay

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This article originally appeared on November 11, 2015


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If that doesn't ring a bell, perhaps this character from the "Busytown" series will. Classic!

Image via

Scarry was an incredibly prolific children's author and illustrator. He created over 250 books during his career. His books were loved across the world — over 100 million were sold in many languages.

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