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Movies

We thought Encanto's 'We Don't Talk about Bruno' couldn't get any better. We were wrong.

We thought Encanto's 'We Don't Talk about Bruno' couldn't get any better. We were wrong.

Encanto's "We Don't Talk About Bruno" in 21 languages is magical.

If you didn't spend all of January 2022 singing "We Don't Talk About Bruno" to yourself several times a day, what were you even doing?

People who have watched Disney's "Encanto" and become enchanted with the songs—which is hard not to do when Lin-Manuel Miranda is involved—have joked about what an earworm "We Don't Talk About Bruno" is. But it's not a joke. That song gets in your head and takes over everything. Only unlike many earwormy songs, you end up not minding too much because it's such a good song. It's not No. 1 on the Billboard Chart—both domestically and globally—for no reason.

(Hot tip: When "Bruno" inevitably gets stuck in your head, it's best just to lean into it. Turn it on and turn it up. Sing it out loud and dance around the house. Get your family to join in. Fighting it is futile.)

My family really didn't think "We Don't Talk About Bruno" could get any better. We'd seen some remixes and mash-ups, but nothing made the original any better—until now.


Last month, Disney released a version of the song that seamlessly incorporates 21 different languages. Disney movies are beloved around the world and their popular films get dubbed into various languages. It's a formidable task, trying to match up the voices and timing and meaning as closely as possible to the original while still sounding good in different languages. As with all things Disney, the standards of quality are high, which becomes apparent when you see how well it works to put these languages together.

For those who haven't heard it (First of all, how? Secondly, why?) the song is sung by various members of the Madrigal family, whose individual magical gifts help them serve the village of Encanto. The gift of one family member, Bruno, was the ability to glimpse the future, which had caused some problems in the past when people misunderstood his predictions as actually causing those things to happen. He disappeared one day, leaving behind nothing but rumors about how he had made all kinds of terrible things happen, which is what this song illustrates.

Watch:

Amazing, right? It's mind-blowing how many languages there are in the world (this is just 21 of thousands) and that humans have so many ways of saying—or singing—the exact same thing. Many of us may have never even heard some of these languages spoken before. And some of them sound a bit different when they are sung versus being spoken. So fun to listen to.

The video has been viewed more than 27 million times. And now Disney has released a version of another "Encanto" favorite "Surface Pressure" in 27 languages. And yes, it's just as impressive.

"Surface Pressure" is the theme song for Luisa, the Madrigal family member whose gift of strength is constantly being called upon by the family and community. She sings about how much pressure she feels beneath the surface to always be strong, never breaking no matter what. Her song has resonated with people everywhere who suffer from expectations of perfection and being able to handle it all, either from themselves or others.

It's an internal reality people in various cultures face, so hearing it sung in more than two dozen languages truly feels right.

Well done, Disney. Just when we think you've achieved unmatched greatness yet again, you turn around and make it even better.

Nature

Pennsylvania home is the entrance to a cave that’s been closed for 70 years

You can only access the cave from the basement of the home and it’s open for business.

This Pennsylvania home is the entrance to a cave.

Have you ever seen something in a movie or online and thought, "That's totally fake," only to find out it's absolutely a real thing? That's sort of how this house in Pennsylvania comes across. It just seems too fantastical to be real, and yet somehow it actually exists.

The home sits between Greencastle and Mercersburg, Pennsylvania, and houses a pretty unique public secret. There's a cave in the basement. Not a man cave or a basement that makes you feel like you're in a cave, but an actual cave that you can't get to unless you go through the house.

Turns out the cave was discovered in the 1830s on the land of John Coffey, according to Uncovering PA, but the story of how it was found is unclear. People would climb down into the cave to explore occasionally until the land was leased about 100 years later and a small structure was built over the cave opening.

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Health

This company makes it easier than ever to enjoy guilt-free fairly traded coffee

Thanks to Lifeboost, good coffee can be good for everyone.

Unsplash

Lifeboost coffee

Americans love coffee. Like, we really, seriously, truly love it. According to one recent survey, 75 percent of U.S. adults drink coffee at least occasionally, while 53 percent—about 110 million people—drink it every single day. For some, coffee is an essential part of their morning ritual. For others, it’s something they enjoy when they hit the proverbial wall in the late afternoon. But either way, millions of people use coffee to boost energy, focus, and productivity.


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Pop Culture

Buffy Sainte-Marie shares what led to her openly breastfeeding on 'Sesame Street' in 1977

The way she explained to Big Bird what she was doing is still an all-time great example.

"Sesame Street" taught kids about life in addition to letters and numbers.

In 1977, singer-songwriter Buffy Sainte-Marie did something revolutionary: She fed her baby on Sesame Street.

The Indigenous Canadian-Ameican singer-songwriter wasn't doing anything millions of other mothers hadn't done—she was simply feeding her baby. But the fact that she was breastfeeding him was significant since breastfeeding in the United States hit an all-time low in 1971 and was just starting to make a comeback. The fact that she did it openly on a children's television program was even more notable, since "What if children see?" has been a key pearl clutch for people who criticize breastfeeding in public.

But the most remarkable thing about the "Sesame Street" segment was the lovely interchange between Big Bird and Sainte-Marie when he asked her what she was doing.

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Pop Culture

Linda Ronstadt's 1970's ballad is a chart-topping hit once again thanks to 'The Last of Us'

The iconic 70s song "Long, Long Time" was an integral part of an unforgettable episode that fans are calling a masterpiece.

Linda Ronstadt (left), Nick Offerman and Murray Bartlett (right)

HBO’s emotional third episode of the zombie series “The Last Of Us” became an instant favorite among fans, thanks in no small part to Linda Ronstadt’s late 1970s ballad, “Long, Long Time.”

Using the song as the episode’s title, “Long, Long Time,” moves away from the show’s main plot to instead focus on a heartbreakingly beautiful love story between Bill (Nick Offerman) and Frank (Murray Bartlett), from its endearing start all the way to its bittersweet end.

The song makes its first appearance during the initial stages of Bill and Frank’s romance as they play the tune on the piano, just before they share their first kiss.

We see their entire lives together play out—one of closeness, devotion, and savoring homegrown strawberries—until they meet their end. The song then plays on the radio, bringing the bottle episode to a poignant close.

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Joy

34-year-old man is learning to read on TikTok in series of motivational videos

His reading skills have improved so much that he plans to read 100 books this year.

@oliverspeaks1/TikTok

Oliver James is the biggest star on BookTok.

With over 125,000 followers, 34-year-old Oliver James is a star in the BookTok community. And it all started with a very simple goal: Learn to read.

For most kids, school is a place where they can develop a relationship with learning in a safe environment. For James, school was the opposite. Growing up with learning and behavior disabilities subjected him to abusive teaching practices in special education, which, of course, did nothing to help.

"The special education system at the time was more focused on behavioral than educating," he told Good Morning America. "So they spent a lotta time restraining us, a lotta time disciplining us, a lotta times putting us in positions to kinda shape us to just not act out in class."

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via Pexels

A couple celebrates while packing their home.

One of the topics that we like to highlight on Upworthy is people who are redefining what it means to be in a relationship. Recently, we’ve shared the stories of platonic life partners, moms who work together as part of a “mommune” and a polyamorous family with four equally-committed parents.

A growing number of people are reevaluating traditional relationships and entering lifestyles that work for them instead of trying to fit into preexisting roles. It makes sense because the more lifestyle options that are available, the greater chance we have to be happy.

A recent trend in unconventional relationships is married couples "living apart together," or LATs as they are known among mental health professionals.

Actress Helena Bonham Carter and director Tim Burton, actress Gwyneth Paltrow and producer Brad Falchuk, and photographer Annie Leibovitz and activist Susan Sontag are all high-profile couples who’ve embraced the LAT lifestyle.

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