She thought her trainer was flirting with her. But he just thought she looked like Buzz Lightyear.

We're in the middle of Hot Girl Summer — a concept I loosely understand as "feel yourself regardless of gender or societal expectations of attractiveness" — which means that we should all, as Megan Thee Stallion, originator of the term, explains, spending our Julys and Augusts being unapologetically ourselves and "having a good-ass time, hyping up your friends, doing you, not giving a damn about what nobody got to say about it."

That's the spirit (I think) one woman on Twitter was living when she decided her personal trainer was flirting with her. The signs were all there. Or at least two signs. Or one. It depends on whether you think someone taking a picture of you and then asking for your number to send it is a behavior set made up of two distinct and separate actions or just a single complex one.

What Emily Baumgartner (the Twitter user in question) didn't know when she handed her number over, thought, was that she was about to be rocketed to the kind of anxiety-inducing 24-hour celebrity stardom that so many people hope and dream for (even if it doesn't translate to more subscribers). And that's why, reader, she posted what happened next.

And. Here. It. Is.

Real quick, I just want to say that just because you look like Buzz Lightyear doesn't mean someone isn't flirting with you. In fact, I remember the girls in middle school arguing over whether they'd prefer Buzz or Woody as their boyfriends and eventual husbands.

But also: This is very, very funny. And it got even funnier when others got involved. I don't like to throw the term "chortle" around, but I definitely breathed real heavy when I saw the following response:

And then someone really got into it, taking the picture and making Baumgartner look even more like she was about to star in a computer-animated feature.

Have you seen "Toy Story 4" yet? Because...

STOP:

Baumgartner, is, fortunately, taking all of this in stride. She's already posted tweets to let Pixar know that she should be compensated for all the marketing she's doing for them, shared her Venmo with all her new fans, and even retweeted a poll about what her new reality show should be called. But none of that's as important as the fact that she's now got the best opener if she wants to flirt with her trainer. Or the reality that this is a story she can tell people TO INFINITY....AND BEYOND!!

True

If the past year has taught us nothing else, it's that sending love out into the world through selfless acts of kindness can have a positive ripple effect on people and communities. People all over the United States seemed to have gotten the message — 71% of those surveyed by the World Giving Index helped a stranger in need in 2020. A nonprofit survey found 90% helped others by running errands, calling, texting and sending care packages. Many people needed a boost last year in one way or another and obliging good neighbors heeded the call over and over again — and continue to make a positive impact through their actions in this new year.

Upworthy and P&G Good Everyday wanted to help keep kindness going strong, so they partnered up to create the Lead with Love Fund. The fund awards do-gooders in communities around the country with grants to help them continue on with their unique missions. Hundreds of nominations came pouring in and five winners were selected based on three criteria: the impact of action, uniqueness, and "Upworthy-ness" of their story.

Here's a look at the five winners:

Edith Ornelas, co-creator of Mariposas Collective in Memphis, Tenn.

Edith Ornelas has a deep-rooted connection to the asylum-seeking immigrant families she brings food and supplies to families in Memphis, Tenn. She was born in Jalisco, Mexico, and immigrated to the United States when she was 7 years old with her parents and sister. Edith grew up in Chicago, then moved to Memphis in 2016, where she quickly realized how few community programs existed for immigrants. Two years later, she helped create Mariposas Collective, which initially aimed to help families who had just been released from detention centers and were seeking asylum. The collective started out small but has since grown to approximately 400 volunteers.