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Build-a-Bear just announced they'll be selling Baby Yodas, so maybe get in line now

Hold onto your light sabers, Star Wars fans. Official Baby Yoda stuffies are finally on their way.

Since the first episode of The Mandalorian aired on Disney's new streaming service, people have been scrambling to get their hands on any Baby Yoda merchandise they can find—a search that has proven fruitless due to Disney's staunch protection of the character.

As of now, you can pre order aBaby Yoda action figure on Amazon, but you won't be able to actually receive it until freaking May. If you want a real stuffed Baby Yoda sooner than that—and who doesn't—you're stuck trying to make one yourself.

But that's about to change.


Today, Build-a-Bear CEO Sharon Price John announced that it has partnered with Disney and Star Wars to bring Baby Yoda to its stores. She said they started the process almost with the first episode, and that the plush Baby Yoda would be available at Build-a-Bear stores within the next few months.

Within the next few months is a bit of a vague timeline, but presumably that means earlier than freaking May. Hallelujah!

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"I'm excited to share we will be one of the first companies to provide the digital and internet phenomenon who is trending higher than all the presidential candidates combined," John told the audience at the ICR Conference in Orlando, Florida, according to Business Insider.

"We now will have The Child, also known as Baby Yoda," she added.

Remember the crazed hoards who clamored to stores to snag a Tickle-Me-Elmo? I think we're about to see a reboot of that mania. And honestly, it's not hard to see why if you've actually watched The Mandalorian. Baby Yoda is painfully adorable. No one can resist him, and it's not just because he uses the force.

It's melt-worthy moments like these top 10 Baby Yoda scenes that Mojo pulled together that have stolen our hearts. Dare you to watch and not fall head over heels for the lil' green bebe and wish you had your own Baby Yoda to snuggle.

Top 10 Baby Yoda Momentswww.youtube.com

I hope Build-a-Bear is prepared for the deluge of business they're bound to receive. May the force be with them.


GOOD Media Group may receive a percentage of revenue from items purchased that are mentioned in this article

via UNSW

This article originally appeared on 07.10.21


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