Budweiser tries to apologize for old sexist ads by re-doing some of them for today’s woman.

There are three big reasons why sexist beer ads have fallen by the wayside over the past few years.

1. Millennials are turned off by sexist advertising that degrades women.

2. Craft beers are taking up big shares of the marketplace and their emphasis on quality means more shots of quality hops and less shots of long legs.


3. More women are drinking beer and beverage companies would rather not turn off potential female customers.

On International Women’s Day, Budweiser issued a semi-apology for its long history of sexist ads by reimagining three that ran between 1956 and 1962. The new ads transform the images of women from subservient servers of the frothy brew to empowered consumers who love to pop open a cold one and unwind.

The campaign was created in collaboration with SeeHer, an organization devoted to the accurate portrayal of women in media and advertising.

1956: A woman opens a large pot on the stove as a man enjoys a foamy schooner of Bud. Why can't she have a beer, too?

via Budweiser

2019: After a woman’s favorite Chinese food is delivered, she cracks open a Budweiser to enjoy some time to herself.

via Budweiser

1958: A woman pours her man a Bud while he fixes what looks like a rotary phone. Because he obviously can't pour one for himself.

via Budweiser

2019: A man and woman cheers each other while they appear to be moving into a new home. There’s also a nice big pizza on the floor that looks like delivery so it wasn’t cooked by the woman.

via Budweiser

1962: This one is really sexist. In this ad, the woman is in a bridal get up and thinking about how she married two men, the one that’s packing up their luggage for their honeymoon and his inner self that needs to feel “contented.” How can she make him feel fulfilled? By making “delicious dishes” complemented by the “best beer ever brewed.”

via Budweiser

2019: The headline says it all in this one: “She Found She Has it All.” The woman isn't fulfilled because she makes a mean pot roast for her husband, but because she has a diverse group of girlfriends and they love having a Bud together.

via Budweiser

True

If the past year has taught us nothing else, it's that sending love out into the world through selfless acts of kindness can have a positive ripple effect on people and communities. People all over the United States seemed to have gotten the message — 71% of those surveyed by the World Giving Index helped a stranger in need in 2020. A nonprofit survey found 90% helped others by running errands, calling, texting and sending care packages. Many people needed a boost last year in one way or another and obliging good neighbors heeded the call over and over again — and continue to make a positive impact through their actions in this new year.

Upworthy and P&G Good Everyday wanted to help keep kindness going strong, so they partnered up to create the Lead with Love Fund. The fund awards do-gooders in communities around the country with grants to help them continue on with their unique missions. Hundreds of nominations came pouring in and five winners were selected based on three criteria: the impact of action, uniqueness, and "Upworthy-ness" of their story.

Here's a look at the five winners:

Edith Ornelas, co-creator of Mariposas Collective in Memphis, Tenn.

Edith Ornelas has a deep-rooted connection to the asylum-seeking immigrant families she brings food and supplies to families in Memphis, Tenn. She was born in Jalisco, Mexico, and immigrated to the United States when she was 7 years old with her parents and sister. Edith grew up in Chicago, then moved to Memphis in 2016, where she quickly realized how few community programs existed for immigrants. Two years later, she helped create Mariposas Collective, which initially aimed to help families who had just been released from detention centers and were seeking asylum. The collective started out small but has since grown to approximately 400 volunteers.