There are three big reasons why sexist beer ads have fallen by the wayside over the past few years.

1. Millennials are turned off by sexist advertising that degrades women.

2. Craft beers are taking up big shares of the marketplace and their emphasis on quality means more shots of quality hops and less shots of long legs.


3. More women are drinking beer and beverage companies would rather not turn off potential female customers.

On International Women’s Day, Budweiser issued a semi-apology for its long history of sexist ads by reimagining three that ran between 1956 and 1962. The new ads transform the images of women from subservient servers of the frothy brew to empowered consumers who love to pop open a cold one and unwind.

The campaign was created in collaboration with SeeHer, an organization devoted to the accurate portrayal of women in media and advertising.

1956: A woman opens a large pot on the stove as a man enjoys a foamy schooner of Bud. Why can't she have a beer, too?

via Budweiser

2019: After a woman’s favorite Chinese food is delivered, she cracks open a Budweiser to enjoy some time to herself.

via Budweiser

1958: A woman pours her man a Bud while he fixes what looks like a rotary phone. Because he obviously can't pour one for himself.

via Budweiser

2019: A man and woman cheers each other while they appear to be moving into a new home. There’s also a nice big pizza on the floor that looks like delivery so it wasn’t cooked by the woman.

via Budweiser

1962: This one is really sexist. In this ad, the woman is in a bridal get up and thinking about how she married two men, the one that’s packing up their luggage for their honeymoon and his inner self that needs to feel “contented.” How can she make him feel fulfilled? By making “delicious dishes” complemented by the “best beer ever brewed.”

via Budweiser

2019: The headline says it all in this one: “She Found She Has it All.” The woman isn't fulfilled because she makes a mean pot roast for her husband, but because she has a diverse group of girlfriends and they love having a Bud together.

via Budweiser

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Share your vision for shaping the future: take this 1-minute survey. Your responses to this survey will inform global priorities now and going forward.

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True

The United Nations is marking its 75th anniversary at a time of great challenge, including the worst global health crisis in its history. Will it bring the world closer together? Or will it lead to greater divides and mistrust?

Share your vision for shaping the future: take this 1-minute survey. Your responses to this survey will inform global priorities now and going forward.

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