Arkansas' racist Capitol Hills statues are being replaced by two incredible icons.

After the Charleston church shooting in June 2015, municipalities throughout the U.S. began removing Confederate statues from state buildings and parks. This accelerated in 2017, after the after the Unite the Right rally in Charlottesville, Virginia.

The state of Arkansas has just realized that it’s not 1865 and will replace the two statues of racists representing the state in the Statuary Hall collection on Capitol Hill.

One statue is of Uriah Milton Rose, an attorney who sided with the Confederacy. The other is James P. Clarke, a United States senator (1903-1916) and governor of the state (1895 - 1897), who as a strident white supremacist.


Arkansas Republican governor Asa Hutchinson made no mention that racism had anything to do with the removal of the statues. “Most everyone who was involved in the discussion agreed we needed to update the statues with representatives of our more recent history,” he said.

However, the state has made two great choices on the two new statues that will represent the state: music icon Johnny Cash and civil rights activist Daisy Lee Gatson Bates.

[rebelmouse-image 19496938 dam="1" original_size="1200x624" caption="via unknown / wikimedia commons and RV1684 / Flickr" expand=1]via unknown / wikimedia commons and RV1684 / Flickr

Bates served as the President of the Arkansas chapter of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP) and organized the Little Rock Nine.

The Little Rock Nine was a group of African-American children who were prevented from entering the recently-desegregated Little Rock Central High School by governor Orval Faubus in 1957.

Bates bravely guided, protected, and advised the nine students until President Eisenhower dispatched the 101st Airborne Division to ensure the children were allowed to attend the school.

Gatson also published the The Arkansas Weekly, one of the few African-American newspapers of that time solely dedicated to the Civil Rights Movement.

Johnny Cash, a.k.a. “The Man in Black,” from Kingsland, Arkansas, is one of the biggest selling musical artists of all time. The country outlaw is famous for such hits as “I Walk the Line,” “Ring of Fire,” and “Folsom Prison Blues.”

Cash was also an advocate for Native American rights, pushed president Richard Nixon for prison reform, and protested against the Vietnam and Iraq wars.

When asked in the late ‘70s why he still wore black he replied: “The old are still neglected, the poor are still poor, the young are still dying before their time, and we’re not making any moves to make things right. There’s still plenty of darkness to carry off.”

That first car is a rite of passage into adulthood. Specifically, the hard-earned lesson of expectations versus reality. Though some of us are blessed with Teslas at 17, most teenagers receive a car that’s been … let’s say previously loved. And that’s probably a good thing, considering nearly half of first-year drivers end up in wrecks. Might as well get the dings on the lemon, right?

Of course, wrecks aside, buying a used car might end up costing more in the long run after needing repairs, breaking down and just a general slew of unexpected surprises. But hey, at least we can all look back and laugh.

My first car, for example, was a hand-me-down Toyota of some sort from my mother. I don’t recall the specific model, but I definitely remember getting into a fender bender within the first week of having it. She had forgotten to get the brakes fixed … isn’t that a fun story?

Jimmy Fallon recently asked his “Tonight Show” audience on Twitter to share their own worst car experiences. Some of them make my brake fiasco look like cakewalk (or cakedrive, in this case). Either way, these responses might make us all feel a little less alone. Or at the very least, give us a chuckle.

Here are 22 responses with the most horsepower:

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Joy

Man uses TikTok to offer 'dinner with dad' to any kid that needs one, even adult ones

Summer Clayton is the father of 2.4 million kids and he couldn’t be more proud.

Come for the food, stay for the wholesomeness.

Summer Clayton is the father of 2.4 million kids and he couldn’t be more proud. His TikTok channel is dedicated to giving people intimate conversations they might long to have with their own father, but can’t. The most popular is his “Dinner With Dad” segment.

The concept is simple: Clayton, aka Dad, always sets down two plates of food. He always tells you what’s for dinner. He always blesses the food. He always checks in with how you’re doing.

I stress the stability here, because as someone who grew up with a less-than-stable relationship with their parents, it stood out immediately. I found myself breathing a sigh of relief at Clayton’s consistency. I also noticed the immediate emotional connection created just by being asked, “How was your day?” According to relationship coach and couples counselor Don Olund, these two elements—stability and connection—are fundamental cravings that children have of their parents. Perhaps we never really stop needing it from them.


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TikTok about '80s childhood is a total Gen X flashback.

As a Gen X parent, it's weird to try to describe my childhood to my kids. We're the generation that didn't grow up with the internet or cell phones, yet are raising kids who have never known a world without them. That difference alone is enough to make our 1980s childhoods feel like a completely different planet, but there are other differences too that often get overlooked.

How do you explain the transition from the brown and orange aesthetic of the '70s to the dusty rose and forest green carpeting of the '80s if you didn't experience it? When I tell my kids there were smoking sections in restaurants and airplanes and ashtrays everywhere, they look horrified (and rightfully so—what were we thinking?!). The fact that we went places with our friends with no quick way to get ahold of our parents? Unbelievable.

One day I described the process of listening to the radio, waiting for my favorite song to come on so I could record it on my tape recorder, and how mad I would get when the deejay talked through the intro of the song until the lyrics started. My Spotify-spoiled kids didn't even understand half of the words I said.

And '80s hair? With the feathered bangs and the terrible perms and the crunchy hair spray? What, why and how?

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