+
More

Anne Hathaway reveals an uncomfortable truth about her own sexist behavior.

The actress opened up about her own biases in a powerful interview.

Anne Hathaway is getting a lot of praise for her surprising confession about on-set misogyny in a recent interview.

Sitting down with ABC's Peter Travers, who asked if there was a particular film of hers that stayed with her because of the lessons learned during production, Hathaway surprised everyone with her response.

She pointed to her 2011 film "One Day" and her experience working with a female director (Lone Scherfig), which forced her to confront something she hadn't noticed before: not just that misogyny exists, but that Hathaway herself was guilty of harboring it.


Hathaway regrets "not trusting [Scherfig] more easily" on set, she explained.

"I’m so scared that I treated her with internalized misogyny," Hathaway said. "I'm scared that I didn't give her everything that she needed ... because I was resisting her on some level. It's something that I've thought a lot about in terms of when I get scripts to be directed by women."

Photo by Jason Merritt/Getty Images.

Hathaway admitted a troubling pattern she noticed in her own behavior. When given a script written by a woman or watching a film directed by a woman, she tended to automatically look for flaws; when looking at the work of men, however, she would subconsciously focus on what they did right.

The first step to overcoming this kind of unconscious bias is to be aware of it and how it affects the work around you.

In Hathaway's case, it was acknowledging that she may have struggled to trust a director because of her gender. Whether it's regarding race, gender, sexual orientation, religion, or a number of other social and cultural factors, we all have our own biases — even if we don't know it. And sometimes, like in Hathaway's case, it can even be a bias against your own group.

Acknowledging your own biases can be hard; admitting them publicly can be even trickier, which is what makes Hathaway's admission so refreshing.

Hathaway hopes her comments will inspire others to more closely examine their own unconscious prejudices. On Facebook, actress Rose McGowan wrote about her own experience with internalized misogyny and female directors.

Photo by Nicholas Hunt/Getty Images for Christian Dior Couture.

To unravel our own biases, we need to start with self-awareness. Hopefully, Hathaway's own honesty will inspire more people to give themselves a periodic bias-check.

Pop Culture

She bought the perfect wedding dress that went viral on TikTok. It was only $3.75

Lynch is part of a growing line of newlyweds going against the regular wedding tradition of spending loads of money.

Making a priceless memory

Upon first glance, one might think that Jillian Lynch wore a traditional (read: expensive) dress to her wedding. After all, it did look glamorous on her. But this 32-year-old bride has a secret superpower: thrifting.

Lynch posted her bargain hunt on TikTok, sharing that she had been perusing thrift shops in Ohio for four days in a row, with the actual ceremony being only a month away. Lynch then displays an elegant ivory-colored Camila Coelho dress. Fitting perfectly, still brand new and with the tags on it, no less.

You can find that exact same dress on Revolve for $220. Lynch bought it for only $3.75.
Keep ReadingShow less

This article originally appeared on 08.21.18


Addie Rodriguez was supposed to take the field with her dad during a high school football game, where he, along with other dads, would lift her onto his shoulders for a routine. But Addie's dad was halfway across the country, unable to make the event.

Her father is Abel Rodriguez, a veteran airman who, after tours in Iraq and Afghanistan, was training at Travis Air Force Base in California, 1,700 miles from his family in San Antonio at the time.

"Mom missed the memo it was parent day, and the reason her mom missed the memo was her dad left Wednesday," said Alexis Perry-Rodriguez, Addie's mom. She continued, "It was really heartbreaking to see your daughter standing out there being the only one without their father, knowing why he's away. It's not just an absentee parent. He's serving our country."

Keep ReadingShow less
Joy

1991 blooper clip of Robin Williams and Elmo is a wholesome nugget of comedic genius

Robin Williams is still bringing smiles to faces after all these years.

Robin Williams and Elmo (Kevin Clash) bloopers.

The late Robin Williams could make picking out socks funny, so pairing him with the fuzzy red monster Elmo was bound to be pure wholesome gold. Honestly, how the puppeteer, Kevin Clash, didn’t completely break character and bust out laughing is a miracle. In this short outtake clip, you get to see Williams crack a few jokes in his signature style while Elmo tries desperately to keep it together.

Williams has been a household name since what seems like the beginning of time, and before his death in 2014, he would make frequent appearances on "Sesame Street." The late actor played so many roles that if you were ask 10 different people what their favorite was, you’d likely get 10 different answers. But for the kids who spent their childhoods watching PBS, they got to see him being silly with his favorite monsters and a giant yellow canary. At least I think Big Bird is a canary.

When he stopped by "Sesame Street" for the special “Big Bird's Birthday or Let Me Eat Cake” in 1991, he was there to show Elmo all of the wonderful things you could do with a stick. Williams turns the stick into a hockey stick and a baton before losing his composure and walking off camera. The entire time, Elmo looks enthralled … if puppets can look enthralled. He’s definitely paying attention before slumping over at the realization that Williams goofed a line. But the actor comes back to continue the scene before Elmo slinks down inside his box after getting Williams’ name wrong, which causes his human co-star to take his stick and leave.

The little blooper reel is so cute and pure that it makes you feel good for a few minutes. For an additional boost of serotonin, check out this other (perfectly executed) clip about conflict that Williams did with the two-headed monster. He certainly had a way of engaging his audience, so it makes sense that even after all of these years, he's still greatly missed.