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An Air Canada pilot put a dog's life above profit. It's exceptional and how the world should be.

He didn't care that it cost $10,000 extra in fuel to save the dog. He just did what was right.

An Air Canada pilot put a dog's life above profit. It's exceptional and how the world should be.

A lot of times, we hear bad stories about airlines. Terrible wait times while stuck on the plane, bad customer service. But this time, the story (originally reported by CityNews) is sweet.

A dog's first flying adventure almost goes horribly wrong.

Simba, a 7-year-old French bulldog, was taking the first flight of his life, from Tel Aviv to Toronto. He was hanging out in the cargo hold in his carrier, as over 2 million pets per year do on airlines. Minutes before heading out over the Atlantic Ocean (where temperatures can really freeze things up on a plane) the pilot noticed a problem with the heating system in the cargo hold.


Going out over the Atlantic could prove fatal to animals in the cargo hold without heat.

So the pilot decided to reroute and land in Frankfurt, Germany. The decision likely saved the dog's life.

His owner, German Kontorovich, is so grateful.

"It's my dog, it's like my child. It's everything to me." — Simba's dad

This is Simba and his owner reuniting in Toronto. GIF via CityNews.

And, of course, many of the 260 passengers really didn't mind the 75-minute delay, either, given the very important reason it had to happen.

"While we recognize this was an inconvenience for our customers, the overall reaction was positive, particularly once people understood the dog was in potential danger but safe as a result of the diversion." — Peter Fitzpatrick, spokesperson for Air Canada

GIF via CityNews.

"I'd probably have been upset, but if it saved the dog..." — airline passenger

Phyl Durdy, an aviation expert, told CityNews that it probably cost around $10,000 in fuel and other costs for the diversion, but it was the right thing to do.

Crisis was averted, and Air Canada is probably going to curry favor with animal lovers and pet owners everywhere. Somebody needs to give that pilot a raise!

Photo by Louis Hansel on Unsplash
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This story was originally shared on Capital One.

Inside the walls of her kitchen at her childhood home in Guatemala, Evelyn Klohr, the founder of a Washington, D.C.-area bakery called Kakeshionista, was taught a lesson that remains central to her business operations today.

"Baking cakes gave me the confidence to believe in my own brand and now I put my heart into giving my customers something they'll enjoy eating," Klohr said.

While driven to launch her own baking business, pursuing a dream in the culinary arts was economically challenging for Klohr. In the United States, culinary schools can open doors to future careers, but the cost of entry can be upwards of $36,000 a year.

Through a friend, Klohr learned about La Cocina VA, a nonprofit dedicated to providing job training and entrepreneurship development services at a training facility in the Washington, D.C-area.

La Cocina VA's, which translates to "the kitchen" in Spanish, offers its Bilingual Culinary Training program to prepare low-and moderate-income individuals from diverse backgrounds to launch careers in the food industry.

That program gave Klohr the ability to fully immerse herself in the baking industry within a professional kitchen facility and receive training in an array of subjects including culinary skills, food safety, career development and English language classes.

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Vanna White appeared on "The Price Is Right" in 1980.

Vanna White has been a household name in the United States for decades, which is kind of hilarious when you consider how she gained her fame and fortune. Since 1982, the former model and actress has made millions walking back and forth turning letters (and later simply touching them—yay technology) on the game show "Wheel of Fortune."

That's it. Walking back and forth in a pretty evening gown, flipping letters and clapping for contestants. More on that job in a minute…

As a member of Gen X, television game shows like "Wheel of Fortune" and "The Price is Right" send me straight back to my childhood. Watching this clip from 1980 of Vanna White competing on "The Price is Right" two years before she started turning letters on "Wheel of Fortune" is like stepping into a time machine. Bob Barker's voice, the theme music, the sound effects—I swear I'm home from school sick, lying on the ugly flowered couch with my mom checking my forehead and bringing me Tang.

This video has it all: the early '80s hairstyles, a fresh-faced Vanna White and Bob Barker's casual sexism that would never in a million years fly today.

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