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A dad is doing his part to make sure his daughters always keep their confidence.

'They’re not a novelty act. ... They’re here to compete.'

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What Dads Do

"I will do anything to make sure my daughters have a seat at the table."

Doyin Richards wants to make sure his daughters know they can do anything boys can do. That's just one reason he coached his daughter's all-girl T-ball team — the only all-girl team in the league.

"They’re not a novelty act," he says, explaining that the team sometimes gets strange looks from parents on the opposing teams. "They're not here to just prance around and pick daisies in the outfield and look cute. They’re here to compete. They want to win."


He knows that when kids are young, they think anything is possible.

When he asks his team, "Who is the fastest girl on the team?" they all raise their hands.

As they grow up, however, around the third or fourth grade, he says, he notices that they start to hesitate. Girls often get the incorrect impression that they are somehow less strong or competitive.

Doyin knows — as parents do — that his daughters can do anything they set their minds to. That's an attitude he wants to make sure they keep their entire lives.

Watch Doyin explain how he instills such important lessons in his team in this episode of "What Dads Do":

(And enjoy the physical comedy at 1:34.)


For some people, every day is Independence Day. For Janis Shinwari, this will be his first 4th of July as an American citizen. And boy, he earned it.

"If I was in Afghanistan—if I didn't come here, I wouldn't be alive now. I would be dead." Shinwari told CNN Heroes in 2018. Shinwari risked his life for nine years serving as a translator for U.S. forces in his native country of Afghanistan. He risked his life everyday knowing that should he be caught by the Taliban, the consequences would be severe. "If the Taliban catch you, they will torture you in front of your kids and families and make a film of you." Shinwari said. "Then [they'll] send it to other translators as a warning message to stop working with the American forces."

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