10 photographs that boldly show how very different life is in the 2 Koreas

These images of insular North Korea are jarring next to images from South Korea (whose democracy is pretty similar to the U.S.'s). The image parings show how radically different life is in each half of a divided Korea.




Street scene in Insa-dong (Seoul, South Korea)



Street scene in Pyongyang (North Korea)





Bus stop for Boseong Girls' Middle & High School (South Korea)





Bus stop in Pyongyang (North Korea)



Hat seller on Insa-dong Street (South Korea)



Policewoman on Janggwang Street (North Korea)





Seoul Metropolitan Subway (South Korea)



Pyongyang Metro (North Korea)





Suburb of Seoul (South Korea)





Fields in the Gangdong district (North Korea)

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When a pet is admitted to a shelter it can be a traumatizing experience. Many are afraid of their new surroundings and are far from comfortable showing off their unique personalities. The problem is that's when many of them have their photos taken to appear in online searches.

Chewy, the pet retailer who has dedicated themselves to supporting shelters and rescues throughout the country, recognized the important work of a couple in Tampa, FL who have been taking professional photos of shelter pets to help get them adopted.

"If it's a photo of a scared animal, most people, subconsciously or even consciously, are going to skip over it," pet photographer Adam Goldberg says. "They can't visualize that dog in their home."

Adam realized the importance of quality shelter photos while working as a social media specialist for the Humane Society of Broward County in Fort Lauderdale, Florida.

"The photos were taken top-down so you couldn't see the size of the pet, and the flash would create these red eyes," he recalls. "Sometimes [volunteers] would shoot the photos through the chain-link fences."

That's why Adam and his wife, Mary, have spent much of their free time over the past five years photographing over 1,200 shelter animals to show off their unique personalities to potential adoptive families. The Goldbergs' wonderful work was recently profiled by Chewy in the video above entitled, "A Day in the Life of a Shelter Pet Photographer."

via USO

Army Capt. Justin Meredith used the Bob Hope Legacy Reading Program to read to his son and family while deployed in the Middle East.

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One of the biggest challenges deployed service members face is the feeling of being separated from their families, especially when they have children. It's also very stressful for children to be away from parents who are deployed for long periods of time.

For the past four years, the USO has brought deployed service members and their families closer through a wonderful program that allows them to read together. The Bob Hope Legacy Reading Program gives deployed service members the ability to choose a book, read it on camera, then send both the recording and book to their child.

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