Count The Embarrassing Things You’ve Done On The Internet. More Than Zero? Then Follow These Guys.

Eddie Geller Curated by

On the one-year anniversary of Edward Snowden's revelations about government spying, a group of Internet badasses are unleashing a plan to fight back. And considering how effective Congress is at fixing stuff (ahem!), this might be the best strategy yet.

If you’ve decided now’s the time to catch up on the Snowden debacle, I’ve got you covered. Here’s the original story that started the whole mess, this is why we should be concerned, and here’s an (entertaining) interview with someone who's not a big fan of Snowden. Consider yourself caught up!

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Narrator: We use the Internet to be ourselves, but governments are building a prison around it. We have to stop them - but how? They seem so vast and powerful, but government spies have a weakness. They can hack anybody, but they can't hack everybody.

Folks like the NSA depend on collecting insecure data from tapped fiber. They depend on our mistakes, mistakes we can fix. The plan: Reset the Net. Together on June 5th, one year after Snowden's first NSA story, we all take one powerful step to turn off government spying and turn on freedom.

The call is simple: Find some territory of the Internet that you can protect from prying eyes, seize it, and hold it. Are you a developer? Promise to add one NSA-resistant feature to your app. Are you an Internet user? Promise to try one NSA-resistant privacy tool. Got a website or tumblr? Run our splash screen on June 5th to show the world we're resetting the net.

This is our moment to rally and realize our power. Without needing anyone's permission, we can decide our future; one that's safe, open, and free. It won't be easy, but if we work hard now, the Internet will never be a prison.

Reset the Net - Are you in? Sign up!

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Video from the Reset the Net campaign. Major props go to Fight for the Future, which has put a lot of work into this project and protecting the Internet in all sorts of awesome ways. Thumbnail image via Thinkstock.

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