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With abortion stories like these, we finally have to admit — a woman's life is important, too.

This is the part that no one wants to talk about. But having the freedom to make a choice means nothing if you can't afford the choice you've made.

With abortion stories like these, we finally have to admit — a woman's life is important, too.
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Ultraviolet

Grab your tissues.

The stories shared in this video are gripping and unforgettable — and there are thousands like them that we'll never hear. According to the Guttmacher Institute, in 2008, just one-third of privately insured U.S. women having abortions used that coverage to pay for their procedures; it is not clear how many of their plans offered full or partial coverage for abortion, or how many women were deterred from using their coverage because of concerns about confidentiality. Yikes.


Among women having abortions that year, methods of payment included private insurance (12%), Medicaid (20%, almost all of whom lived in the few states that use their own funds to cover medically necessary abortions), and the most common: paying out of pocket (almost 60%).

After hearing those stories, some of you may be crying, clutching your heart, and asking "Where can I donate?" (Right here.)

But a lot of you may be scratching your head (or perhaps clutching your pearls) and saying "Huh? These women give money to pay for other women to have abortions?" Yes. Yes they do. And you're not alone if you've never heard of such an organization. To be quite honest, I hadn't either until a few years ago. Abortion funds don't get much love and attention. In a society that still considers it groundbreaking to see a realistic depiction of abortion in a mainstream film, the idea of people actually paying for them like any other act of charitable giving is far outside of the realm of respectability. But so are a lot of the most valuable, necessary supports and interventions for women. So let's talk about it, shall we?

What is an abortion fund? And why is it needed? Especially in a world where, as so many pro-choice advocates say, ideally fewer and fewer women would be in the position where an abortion is needed? Well if the stories above didn't make it clear, Third Wave Foundation's Emergency Abortion Fund says it pretty plainly: Abortion funds exist to "prevent economic injustice from determining the reproductive lives" of women.

Boom.

To read more about abortion funds, check out FundAbortionNow.org.

Jimmy Fallon #MyFamilyIsWeird.

It’s that time of year again, the holiday season is when we get the pleasure of spending way more time than we’re used to with our families. For those of us who’ve moved away from our immediate families, the holidays are a great time to reacquaint ourselves with old traditions and to realize that some of them may be a little strange.

Every family seems to have its own brand of weirdness. In fact, I wouldn’t trust anyone who says that their family is completely normal.

On November 18, “The Tonight Show” host Jimmy Fallon gave everyone a reason to celebrate their unique families by asking them to share their favorite stories under #MyFamilyIsWeird. The responses were everything from odd holiday traditions to family members that may have a screw (or two!) loose.

Here are 17 of the funniest responses.

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Andrew Garfield with Stephen Colbert.

Andrew Garfield came onto “The Late Show With Stephen Colbert” to promote his new movie, “tick, tick… Boom.” What he gave instead was a truly touching story about love and loss, with a refreshing and relatable twist.

The sweet moment comes at the four-minute mark of the interview, where Colbert asked Garfield how playing Broadway composer Jonathan Larson (who died suddenly of a heart issue at the upswing of his creative career) helped him process the unexpected loss of his mother.

Instead of wishing the pain away, Garfield states, “I hope this grief stays with me.”

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Bono, Dave Grohl, Ariana Grande

Director Peter Jackson’s new 468-minute Beatles documentary “Get Back” is a landmark achievement. It’s an in-depth, warts-and-all glimpse into the creative process of four of the most important musicians and cultural figures of the past 100 years.

The crazy thing is that’s not even an overstatement. Watching the Beatles pull tunes from the ether and then work them into some of the most enduring songs in the history of popular music is revelatory.

Like when Paul McCartney strums his way into writing “Get Back.”

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