When People Say, 'But What About The Riots?' Just Show Them This

This metaphor might be the one thing that makes talking about Ferguson not horrible. It's not anti-police or pro-riot. It's a super-interesting walk through how unrest has brought change in the world. Cameos from MLK's and President Snow's thoughts on rioters. Who do you think you'll agree with?



WAIT. Is she saying the rioters are doing something good!??!

Nah.


Understanding the place of riots in history is *not* an endorsement! She's just saying that nonviolent political actions have had big impacts throughout history. But so have *less polite" forms of protests. Like these:

If Martin Luther King Jr. could empathize with rioters, why can't everyone else?


Encouraging nonviolent methods of protests is still important. MLK understood riots, but the man didn't really like 'em!

"The limitation of riots, moral questions aside, is that they cannot win and their participants know it. Hence, rioting is not revolutionary but reactionary because it invites defeat. It involves an emotional catharsis, but it must be followed by a sense of futility."
-Martin Luther King Jr.

OUCH.

Still, don't allow yourself to be baited into letting the actions of a few bad actors distract from the true purpose of the recent uprising: #BlackLivesMatter.

Laci Green here is using "The Hunger Games" to keep us ALL from being tricked by the narrative of the mass media.

"They're all radical troublemakers!"
— Bad guys from "The Hunger Games" OR most 24-hour news in the wake of the Ferguson grand jury announcement

It's a real problem.

News outlets have been painting a picture of chaos despite the fact that the vast majority of the protests and protesters have been peaceful.

The protesters just want all people to acknowledge this so that as a society we can work to change it.

And may the odds be ever in their favor. RIP Mike Brown.

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