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Pop Culture

Viral clip shows Vivienne Westwood accurately predicting the future of fashion 25 years ago

The icon and activist passed away on Dec 29 at the age of 81.

vivienne westwood death

The style icon passed away at 81.

The late style icon Vivienne Westwood was ahead of her time in so many ways. Her career was made up of one groundbreaking feat after another—bringing us punk fashion, mohawks, towering pumps and, last but certainly not least, boob T-shirts.

In a resurfaced interview, we see just how forward thinking Westwood really was, after she predicted the future of fashion around 25 years before it actually happened.

The video clip, posted to Twitter by magazine contributor Bri Malandro, shows a younger Westwood explaining how “pressure from the mass market” would be the biggest challenge in the industry.

She follows with a statement that’s more than a little eerily accurate.


“There’s a process whereby technology … the machinery’s been developed so much that they can more or less stamp these things out and they’d never want those machines to stop. Because they want forever and ever to be making money,” she explained.

This need to mass produce and continuously profit would be why more plain and “conforming” clothes would be marketed by various platforms.

“Everybody collaborates in this,” she told the interviewer. “Magazines then get these ordinary jeans or an ordinary white shirt or an ordinary little tube dress with two spaghetti straps and then it’s all photographed as if somehow it’s ‘lifestyle.’”

She added: “You see it all the time on a cover, constantly on the same beautiful women who presumably you feel that if you wear this clothing, this minimal, puritan, awful stuff then you’re going to look like that.”

Today, we have a term for this business model: fast fashion.

Sure, fast fashion companies sell a whole lot more than white T-shirts and jeans, but the essence of Westwood’s prophecy remains true. Fast fashion companies like Shein, Forever 21 and H&M mass produce an overwhelming amount of new (and cheap) styles coming in week after week. These companies now offer 52 “micro-seasons” rather than the standard summer, spring, fall and winter collections. That’s kind of bonkers.

This need for constant output results in, as we know, horrendous working conditions, not to mention it wreaks havoc on the environment. However, the products offer instant gratification at a fraction of the cost. Plus the internet and social media have joined in as “collaborators” to incentivize consumers. So it’s the exact money-making machine Westwood foretold—and business is booming.

Westwood would be the first to say that purchasing and wearing clothing was a vital expression of joy. However, as she famously once said, fashion, “like everything that gives pleasure, it is worth doing well.” Her suggestion? “Buy less. Choose well. Make it last.” Coming from one of the biggest names in fashion history, it seems like substantial advice.

Westwood died on Dec 29, “peacefully and surrounded by her family,” at the age of 81. Her eccentric, bold and controversial clothing choices were, at their core, a form of activism, as she used the runway to voice her opinion on various social topics such as environmental issues, human rights and climate change. She continued creating and working for a better world until the day she died. May we all live so courageously.

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Do you ever feel like you could be doing more when it comes to making a positive impact on your community? The messaging around giving back is louder than ever this time of year, and for good reason; It is the season of giving, after all.

If you’ve ever wondered who is responsible for bringing many of the giving-back initiatives to life, it’s probably not who you’d expect. The masterminds behind these types of campaigns are project managers.

Using their talents and skills, often proven by earning certifications from the Project Management Institute (PMI), project managers are driving real change and increasing the success rate on projects that truly improve our world.

To celebrate the work that project managers are doing behind the scenes to make a difference, we spoke with two people doing more than their part to make an impact.

In his current role as a Project Management Professional (PMP)-certified project manager and environmental engineer for the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), Joshua Williard oversees the cleanup of some of America’s most contaminated and hazardous waste sites.

Courtesy of Joshua Williard

“Recently, I was part of a four-person diving team sent to collect contaminated sediment samples from the bottom of a river in Southeastern Virginia. We wanted to ensure a containment wall was successfully blocking the release of waste into an adjacent river,” Williard says.

Through his work, Josh drives restoration efforts to completion so contaminated land can again be used beneficially, and so future generations will not be at risk of exposure to harmful chemicals.

“I’ve been inspired by the natural world from a young age and always loved being outside. As I gained an understanding about Earth's trajectory, I realized that I wanted to be part of trying to save it and keep it for future generations.

“I learned the importance of using different management styles to address various project challenges. I saw the value in building meaningful relationships with key community members. I came to see that effective project management can make a real difference in getting things done and having on-the-ground impact,” Williard says.

In addition, Monica Chan’s career in project management has enabled her to work at the forefront of conservation efforts with the World Wildlife Fund (WWF-US). She most recently has been managing a climate change project, working with a diverse team including scientists, policy experts, data analysts, biologists, communicators, and more. The goal is to leverage grants to protect and restore mangroves, forests, and ecosystems, and drive demand in seaweed farming – all to harness nature's power to address the climate crisis.

Courtesy of Monica Chan

“As the project management lead for WWF-US, I am collaborating across the organization to build a project management framework that adapts to our diverse projects. Given that WWF's overarching objectives center on conserving nature and addressing imminent threats to the diversity of life on Earth, the stakes are exceptionally high in how we approach projects,” says Chan.

“Throughout my journey, I've discovered a deep passion for project management's ability to unite people for shared goals, contributing meaningfully to environmental conservation,” she says.

With skills learned from on-the-job experience and resources from PMI, project managers are the central point of connection for social impact campaigns, driving them forward and solving problems along the way. They are integral to bringing these projects to life, and they find support from their peers in PMI’s community.

PMI has a global network of more than 300 chapters and serves as a community for project managers – at every stage of their career. Members can share knowledge, celebrate impact, and learn together through resources, events, and other programs such as PMI’s Hours for Impact program, which encourages PMI members to volunteer their time to projects directly supporting the United Nations 17 Sustainable Development Goals.

“By tapping into PMI's extensive network and resources, I've expanded my project management knowledge and skills, gaining insights from seasoned professionals in diverse industries, including environmental management. Exposure to different perspectives has kept me informed about industry trends, best practices, and allowed me to tailor my approach to the unique challenges of the non-profit sector,” Chan says.

“Obtaining my PMP certification has been a game-changer, propelling not only my career growth, but also reshaping my approach to daily projects, both personally and professionally,” Chan says. Research from PMI shows that a career in project management means being part of an industry on the rise, as the global economy will need 25 million new project professionals by 2030 and the median salary for project practitioners in the U.S. is $120K.

PMI’s mission is to help professionals build project management skills through online courses, networking, and other learning opportunities, help them prove their proficiency in project management through certifications, and champion the work that project professionals, like Joshua and Monica, do around the world.

For those interested in pursuing a career in project management to help make a difference, PMI’s Certified Associate in Project Management (CAPM) certification could be the starting point to help get your foot in the door.

Pop Culture

UPS driver shares his weekly paycheck, and now everyone wants to apply

People are shocked to find out how much delivery drivers make.

@skylerleestutzman/TikTok

People were shocked to find out how much Skyler Stutzman earned as a UPS driver

People are seriously considering switching careers after finding out how much can be made as a UPS delivery driver.

Back in October, Skyler Stutzman, an Oregon-based UPS delivery driver went viral after sharing his weekly pay stub on TikTok.

In the clip, Stutzman showed that for 42 hours of work, and at a pay rate of $44.26 per hour, he earned $2,004 before taxes, and ultimately took home $1,300 after deductions.

This both shocked the nearly 12 million viewers who saw the video…not to mention it stirred their jealousy a bit.

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Celebrate sober: the best non-alcoholic bubbly for the holidays, New Years, and beyond

Boisson offers the finest selection of alcohol-free sparkling wines

Celebrations are evolving, and so are our choices in beverages. Boisson is at the forefront of this change, offering a superb selection of non-alcoholic sparkling wines.

Whether you're toasting the holidays, ringing in the New Year, or marking any special occasion, Boisson's curated collection ensures your glass is always filled with elegance and joy—minus the alcohol. Get ready to clink glasses filled with bubbly delights that keep the spirit high and the spirits out!

Thomson & Scott Noughty Alcohol-Free Sparkling Chardonnay: Elegance Without the Alcohol

Who says elegance can't be eco-friendly? Thomson & Scott’s Noughty Alcohol-Free Sparkling Chardonnay is a toast to sustainability and sophistication. Crafted from organic grapes in Spain's sandy vineyards, this bubbly beverage is as kind to the planet as it is to your palate. Its stainless steel fermentation and vacuum distillation process preserve the Chardonnay's rich, classic flavors—making it an irresistible choice for any occasion.

Light and delicately carbonated, it pairs perfectly with a range of hors d'oeuvres and buttery dishes. Indulge in guilt-free luxury with every sip of this sustainably sourced, alcohol-free delight.

French Bloom Le Rosé: A Pink Delight for Every Occasion

French Bloom's Le Rosé is more than just a pretty face. Sourced from certified organic vineyards in the South of France, it's a celebration of sustainability, health, and inclusivity. With its low sugar content and Halal certification, this sparkling rosé caters to various lifestyles and dietary choices.

Its elegant pink hue and refreshing taste make it the perfect partner for a range of dishes, from the rich flavors of foie gras to the lightness of cheesecake. Serve it chilled in a flute to add a touch of luxury to any gathering. Here's to toasting life's moments with a drink that's as delightful as it is conscientious!

French Bloom Le Blanc: Chic and Ceremonial

French Bloom Le Blanc symbolizes elegance and versatility and brings a ceremonial flair to any occasion. Made from the finest organic Chardonnay grapes, this sparkling white celebrates nature's purity, featuring a low sugar profile that dances gracefully on the palate. Its taste—a harmonious blend of orchard fruit with a hint of spice—is enlivened by a subtle mineral acidity.

Whether served traditionally in a chilled flute or with a modern twist over ice garnished with lime, Le Blanc promises a chic, adaptable experience for your taste buds. Here's to sophistication in every sip, naturally.

Wölffer Estate Spring In A Bottle: A Hamptons Summer in Every Sip

Imagine capturing the essence of a Hamptons summer in a glass. Wölffer Estate's Spring In A Bottledoes just that. This non-alcoholic rosé, crafted in the heart of the Hamptons, blends the unique flavors of Pinot Noir, Pinot Meunier, Saint Laurent, and Dornfelder grapes.

Each sip offers a crisp, sophisticated taste, embodying the perfect balance of elegance and playfulness. It's versatile enough for a poolside refreshment or a chic dinner party. Pair it with everything from spicy Asian cuisine to a simple salad, and let each glass transport you to a sun-kissed seaside getaway.

Leitz Eins Zwei Zero Sparkling Riesling: A German Masterpiece

Leitz Eins Zwei Zero Sparkling Riesling is a testament to German winemaking excellence. This non-alcoholic white wine is crafted through a meticulous process, where the finest Riesling grapes undergo fermentation and then gentle vacuum distillation, preserving their natural, wine-like characteristics.

The result? A symphony of flavors with orange citrus, rhubarb, and a hint of tarragon, balanced by a pleasant minerality and a crisp, semi-long finish. This sparkling Riesling is an ideal apéritif or a companion to light, fresh dishes like mussels or truffle-infused pasta. Indulge in the sophistication of German craftsmanship, sip by sparkling sip.

Celebrate the Moments with Boisson’s Non-Alcoholic Elegance

Boisson's exquisite range of non-alcoholic sparkling wines promises elegance in every bottle. From the sustainable sophistication of Thomson & Scott Noughty Chardonnay to the vibrant French Bloom Le Rosé and Le Blanc, each offers a unique tasting experience. Wölffer Estate's Spring In A Bottle brings a touch of Hamptons luxury, while Leitz Eins Zwei Zero Riesling showcases German winemaking at its finest.

This holiday season and beyond, choose Boisson for celebrations that sparkle with style, flavor, and a commitment to sober elegance. Raise your glass to memorable moments crafted by Boisson, and click here to learn more.

Family

A letter to my mother-in-law who spoiled my sons

"It's pointless to dwell on regrets, but I often think about how I had it all wrong. I was so wrong in how I perceived your generosity."

Tina Platamura


You always stole my thunder. You gave them everything they wanted. You never said no when they asked for anything.

Tina Platamura

A second helping of dessert. Candy before dinner. A few more minutes in the bath. Money for the ice cream truck.

I struggled to show you respect and appreciation while trying to make sure you didn't spoil my children. I thought you would turn them into “selfish brats" by giving them everything they wanted. I thought they might never learn to wait, to take turns, to share, because you granted their wishes as soon as they opened their mouths and pointed.

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New study shows it's ok to say no to an invite if you don't want to go.

There are many reasons why people feel uncomfortable turning down invites to social events. We crave connection, fear missing out on a good time and assume we’re hurting other people’s feelings by saying no. But sometimes, turning someone down is unavoidable, and saying yes to everything can lead to burnout.

There’s also the problem of attending things just because you feel obligated. Then, you wind up having a bad night when you could have stayed home and watched TV or read a book.

A recent study found that 77% of people confessed to accepting an invitation to an event they didn’t want to attend because they were nervous that they’d upset the person who invited them. The good news is that the same study found that people are a lot less bothered when we say no to them than we assume.

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Health

Autistic woman ordering room service offers rare insight into internal struggles

What the person on the other end of the phone doesn't see is an entire story unto itself.

Ordering room service can require herculean effort for some people.

One of the weirdest parts of being human is how none of us really knows what's happening in another person's head or how other people act when they're by themselves. We often wonder if we're the only ones whose brains work a certain way or if other people go through the same mental or emotional obstacle courses we do when performing certain tasks.

When you live with someone who deals with mental/emotional challenges like anxiety or someone who lives life with neurodivergence, you see a bit more of people's behind-the-scenes reality. But even then, there are things we don't fully see because they're happening internally.

One autistic woman, however, has offered an insider look into her internal processing in a video showing her ordering room service at a hotel for the first time.

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Only child asks her friends what it's like to grow up with siblings.

Ahhh, siblings. Sometimes they're your best friends and other times your living room turns into an MMA octagon over the remote control. If you grew up with brothers and sisters, it's hard to imagine what it would be like to be an only child. (That's not to say you didn't dream about it when your sister stole your favorite shirt for the 30th time.)

But not everyone has siblings, so it can be equally as hard for someone who grew up as an only child to picture what it would be like to have them. Only children also likely had moments where they dreamt of having a little brother or sister, not realizing the literal torment siblings can inflict on each other.

TikTok creator Lonnie IIV recently posted a video of himself with two other friends seemingly out to lunch, when the girl in the group asked what it was like to grow up with siblings. In less than a minute she realized she lucked out being an only child because her two guy friends gave her a crash course in sibling behavior.

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