To dads and coaches everywhere: This is how you tell your kid you love them.

Little League coach Joel Jensen set an example that players, parents, kids, and adults alike should be proud to follow during one of his son's baseball games.

On Aug. 22, 2016, Isaiah "Bugsy" Jensen took the mound for Bend North, a Little League World Series baseball team from Oregon, as they took on a team from Emilia, Italy.

Isaiah pitched four and one-third innings of near-perfect baseball in front of a crowd of 7,000 fans and a TV audience.


It was the game of Isaiah's life, and he was playing like it.

Photo by AP Photo/Gene J. Puskar.

In the fifth inning, Isaiah began to struggle.

His pitches began to miss the mark; his speed began to trail off. It looked like his day, as good as it had been, was coming to an end.

After walking a batter in the top of the fifth inning, it looked like coaches were ready to pull Isaiah. GIF from ABC News/YouTube.

His dad called for a timeout, emerged from the dugout, and made his way to the mound. It was there that he did something completely unexpected: He told his son that he loved him.

It's not your ordinary pep talk. It's much better. GIF from ABC News/YouTube.

"You're doing awesome out there," Joel told Isaiah. "One more hitter. ... Hey, cheer up, have some fun, and come right after him."

Fresh off the pep talk of a lifetime, Isaiah struck out the next batter before being replaced by one of his teammates.

He struck out his final batter. GIF from ABC News/YouTube.

Sports parents sometimes get a bad rap. The internet is filled with horror stories of dad-slash-coaches who haven't exactly lived up to the expectations of either title. With dads like that in the world of youth sports, being the coach's kid can be rough. After all, no one wants to let down their coach, let alone their dad.

It's heartwarming to see such a positive example of sportsmanship on such a large scale.

Growing up, my dad volunteered to coach my baseball and soccer teams. The love and support he showed me during those years helped shape me into the person I am today. Whether I won or lost, I knew he was always there for me. The interaction between Joel and Isaiah is something I — and lots of people — can relate to on such a personal level. This is what the world needs: love, encouragement, and support.

Parenting: You're doing it right.

Watch Joel's powerful pep talk in the video below.

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If the past year has taught us nothing else, it's that sending love out into the world through selfless acts of kindness can have a positive ripple effect on people and communities. People all over the United States seemed to have gotten the message — 71% of those surveyed by the World Giving Index helped a stranger in need in 2020. A nonprofit survey found 90% helped others by running errands, calling, texting and sending care packages. Many people needed a boost last year in one way or another and obliging good neighbors heeded the call over and over again — and continue to make a positive impact through their actions in this new year.

Upworthy and P&G Good Everyday wanted to help keep kindness going strong, so they partnered up to create the Lead with Love Fund. The fund awards do-gooders in communities around the country with grants to help them continue on with their unique missions. Hundreds of nominations came pouring in and five winners were selected based on three criteria: the impact of action, uniqueness, and "Upworthy-ness" of their story.

Here's a look at the five winners:

Edith Ornelas, co-creator of Mariposas Collective in Memphis, Tenn.

Edith Ornelas has a deep-rooted connection to the asylum-seeking immigrant families she brings food and supplies to families in Memphis, Tenn. She was born in Jalisco, Mexico, and immigrated to the United States when she was 7 years old with her parents and sister. Edith grew up in Chicago, then moved to Memphis in 2016, where she quickly realized how few community programs existed for immigrants. Two years later, she helped create Mariposas Collective, which initially aimed to help families who had just been released from detention centers and were seeking asylum. The collective started out small but has since grown to approximately 400 volunteers.