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You know what's the most fun? Reading.

GIF via "iCarly."

Just ask active reader and badass feminist celebrity Emma Watson.

Photo by Gerard Julien/Getty Images.


Watson loves reading so much, she started a book club last January to inspire others to join her in her obsession.

Watson's book club is called "Our Shared Shelf" and features inspiring stories of women (often written by women) achieving great things and overcoming great odds. To join the club, all you have to do is check the list for what the club is currently reading, pick up a copy, and dive in. It's that simple.

The club's latest book is "Mom & Me & Mom" by Maya Angelou.

Watson knows reading isn't always people's first inclination, especially in this day and age when the digital world is often all-consuming.

But don't worry, she has a plan to change that.

She's been secretly hiding books with personal, handwritten notes all over the London subway system.

How awesome is that?? Imagine: You're on your way to work, listening to music or whatever, when out of nowhere, a cool book catches your eye. When you open it, it happens to have a note from Emma Watson written just for you!

It's like finding Willy Wonka's golden ticket, only better because it comes with two amazing stories you can keep with you forever — how you found it, and the book itself.

Here's a visual clue of one hiding place from the crafty lady.

📚👀 @booksontheunderground @oursharedshelf #Mom&Me&Mom

A video posted by Emma Watson (@emmawatson) on

It's like a magical treasure hunt, and who better to lead it than the woman who played Hermione Granger, aka the queen of reading?

According to a recent Pew Research Center study, young adults in America (18-29) are reading more than any other other age demographic.

This may have something to do with the uptick in the number of young adult books out there right now. Those super-accessible and relatable stories have young adults reading voraciously, which means the written word is far from dead.

Emma Watson, aside from her book club, is an icon of the young adult book craze because of her role in the "Harry Potter" movies. Perhaps now that she's found such a cool way to connect with people over reading (both on the subway and online), she'll inspire many more people to jump back on the reading train and rediscover what magic can come out of opening a book.

A breastfeeding mother's experience at Vienna's Schoenbrunn Zoo is touching people's hearts—but not without a fair amount of controversy.

Gemma Copeland shared her story on Facebook, which was then picked up by the Facebook page Boobie Babies. Photos show the mom breastfeeding her baby next to the window of the zoo's orangutan habitat, with a female orangutan sitting close to the glass, gazing at them.

"Today I got feeding support from the most unlikely of places, the most surreal moment of my life that had me in tears," Copeland wrote.

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gerlalt/Canva

James Earl Jones helped "Sesame Street" prove its pedagogical model for teaching kids the alphabet.

James Earl Jones has one of the most recognizable voices in the entertainment industry and has for decades. Most of us probably heard that deep, resonant voice first as Darth Vader in "Star Wars," or perhaps Mufasa in "The Lion King," but just one or two words are enough to say, "Oh, that's definitely James Earl Jones."

Jones has been acting on stage and in film since the 1960s. He also has the distinction of being the first celebrity guest to be invited to "Sesame Street" during the show's debut season in 1969.

According to Muppet Wiki, clips of Jones counting to 10 and reciting the alphabet were included in unbroadcast pilot episodes and also included in one of the first official television episodes. Funnily enough, Jones originally didn't think the show would last, as he thought kids would be terrified of the muppets. Clearly, that turned out not to be the case.

Jones' alphabet recitation served as a test for the "Sesame Street" pedagogical model, which was meant to inspire interaction from kids rather than just passive absorption. Though to the untrained eye, Jones' slow recitation of the ABCs may seem either plodding or bizarrely hypnotic, there's a purpose to the way it's presented.

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via UNSW

This article originally appeared on 07.10.21


Dr. Daniel Mansfield and his team at the University of New South Wales in Australia have just made an incredible discovery. While studying a 3,700-year-old tablet from the ancient civilization of Babylon, they found evidence that the Babylonians were doing something astounding: trigonometry!

Most historians have credited the Greeks with creating the study of triangles' sides and angles, but this tablet presents indisputable evidence that the Babylonians were using the technique 1,500 years before the Greeks ever were.


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