The delightful reason Emma Watson is hiding books on the subway.

You know what's the most fun? Reading.

GIF via "iCarly."

Just ask active reader and badass feminist celebrity Emma Watson.

Photo by Gerard Julien/Getty Images.


Watson loves reading so much, she started a book club last January to inspire others to join her in her obsession.

Watson's book club is called "Our Shared Shelf" and features inspiring stories of women (often written by women) achieving great things and overcoming great odds. To join the club, all you have to do is check the list for what the club is currently reading, pick up a copy, and dive in. It's that simple.

The club's latest book is "Mom & Me & Mom" by Maya Angelou.

Watson knows reading isn't always people's first inclination, especially in this day and age when the digital world is often all-consuming.

But don't worry, she has a plan to change that.

She's been secretly hiding books with personal, handwritten notes all over the London subway system.

How awesome is that?? Imagine: You're on your way to work, listening to music or whatever, when out of nowhere, a cool book catches your eye. When you open it, it happens to have a note from Emma Watson written just for you!

It's like finding Willy Wonka's golden ticket, only better because it comes with two amazing stories you can keep with you forever — how you found it, and the book itself.

Here's a visual clue of one hiding place from the crafty lady.

📚👀 @booksontheunderground @oursharedshelf #Mom&Me&Mom

A video posted by Emma Watson (@emmawatson) on

It's like a magical treasure hunt, and who better to lead it than the woman who played Hermione Granger, aka the queen of reading?

According to a recent Pew Research Center study, young adults in America (18-29) are reading more than any other other age demographic.

This may have something to do with the uptick in the number of young adult books out there right now. Those super-accessible and relatable stories have young adults reading voraciously, which means the written word is far from dead.

Emma Watson, aside from her book club, is an icon of the young adult book craze because of her role in the "Harry Potter" movies. Perhaps now that she's found such a cool way to connect with people over reading (both on the subway and online), she'll inspire many more people to jump back on the reading train and rediscover what magic can come out of opening a book.

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