The #BlackPantherChallenge raised $260,000. Here's what it is and where the money's going.

He's black. His suit is black. His family is black. His country is black. "Black Panther" is blackity-black-black-black. And it's about damn time.

To say people are excited for this film would be an understatement. It's outpacing every other superhero movie ever in early ticket sales and showings don't begin until February 15. It has the potential to be a cinematic game changer.

Other films have featured black superheroes, but "Black Panther" — with a blockbuster budget, black director, and a predominantly black cast — is in a league of its own.


That's why it's so important children, especially black children, get the opportunity to see the film on the big screen.

Children have known a black president, black athletes, and black performers. But they deserve to see every shade of black visibility — from real-life triumphs in American history to science fiction and fantasy legends. From kings and queens to heroes and heartache, the full gamut of blackness can and should be explored on screen.

Image via Marvel Studios.

So when an entire movie about a black superhero/African prince comes along, it's life-changing stuff for a child. No wonder some didn't even believe it was possible.

Need more proof?

These students from the Ron Clark Academy in Atlanta, Georgia, just found out the whole school is going to see Black Panther. Their reaction can only be described as sheer joy.

A grassroots fundraising effort has raised more than a quarter of a million dollars to buy tickets for kids in need.

Marketing pro and philanthropist Frederick Joseph kicked off the initiative, raising more than $40,000 to take kids from Harlem to see "Black Panther." After his successful campaign, Joseph encouraged others to start their own fundraisers to help send even more children to the theater. People around the world stepped up to Joseph's #BlackPantherChallenge. So far, more than $260,000 has been raised from over 250 campaigns. This money will make it possible for thousands of kids to see the film for free.

"Many of us yearned for the chance to be Batman or Superman, but only if he was black," Jospeh wrote in the Huffington Post. “Black Panther” gives our children the chance to dream those dreams."

Celebrities like Viola Davis, Jemele Hill, Ellen DeGeneres, and Snoop Dogg have chipped in too, using their star power to boost fundraising efforts or launch their own.

Representation and visibility matter.

Seeing someone who looks like you on the big screen is a privilege many take for granted. But it's not lost on generations of black and brown kids who have waited patiently for the opportunity.

And, hopefully, given the early success of the film, they'll never have to wait again.

GIF from "Black Panther."

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When a pet is admitted to a shelter it can be a traumatizing experience. Many are afraid of their new surroundings and are far from comfortable showing off their unique personalities. The problem is that's when many of them have their photos taken to appear in online searches.

Chewy, the pet retailer who has dedicated themselves to supporting shelters and rescues throughout the country, recognized the important work of a couple in Tampa, FL who have been taking professional photos of shelter pets to help get them adopted.

"If it's a photo of a scared animal, most people, subconsciously or even consciously, are going to skip over it," pet photographer Adam Goldberg says. "They can't visualize that dog in their home."

Adam realized the importance of quality shelter photos while working as a social media specialist for the Humane Society of Broward County in Fort Lauderdale, Florida.

"The photos were taken top-down so you couldn't see the size of the pet, and the flash would create these red eyes," he recalls. "Sometimes [volunteers] would shoot the photos through the chain-link fences."

That's why Adam and his wife, Mary, have spent much of their free time over the past five years photographing over 1,200 shelter animals to show off their unique personalities to potential adoptive families. The Goldbergs' wonderful work was recently profiled by Chewy in the video above entitled, "A Day in the Life of a Shelter Pet Photographer."

Vanna White appeared on "The Price Is Right" in 1980.

Vanna White has been a household name in the United States for decades, which is kind of hilarious when you consider how she gained her fame and fortune. Since 1982, the former model and actress has made millions walking back and forth turning letters (and later simply touching them—yay technology) on the game show "Wheel of Fortune."

That's it. Walking back and forth in a pretty evening gown, flipping letters and clapping for contestants. More on that job in a minute…

As a member of Gen X, television game shows like "Wheel of Fortune" and "The Price is Right" send me straight back to my childhood. Watching this clip from 1980 of Vanna White competing on "The Price is Right" two years before she started turning letters on "Wheel of Fortune" is like stepping into a time machine. Bob Barker's voice, the theme music, the sound effects—I swear I'm home from school sick, lying on the ugly flowered couch with my mom checking my forehead and bringing me Tang.

This video has it all: the early '80s hairstyles, a fresh-faced Vanna White and Bob Barker's casual sexism that would never in a million years fly today.

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