Joseph Meili via Alik / Twitter

Joseph Meili

In 2018, Upworthy reported on a disturbing story out of Alaska where a man kidnapped, strangled, and masturbated on a woman and received no jail time.

In August of 2017, Justin Schneider picked up a native Alaskan woman who needed a ride. Later, he pulled over to the side of the road, and told her to get out of the car so he could load some things. Then, he tackled her to the ground, strangled her until she was unconscious, and then mastrubated on her.

A grand jury indicted Schneider on four felony counts including kidnapping, assault, harassment, and "offensive contact with fluids." However, in a grave miscarriage of justice, Schneider struck a plea deal, and Anchorage Superior Court Judge Michael Corey sentenced him to a two-year suspended sentence and gave him credit for the year he served under house arrest.

Essentially, as long as Schneider keeps up with the terms of his probation, he serves no time behind bars.

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Nia Wilson had big dreams.

Like a lot of teenagers, the 18-year-old loved to rap and sing. Wilson hoped to become a lawyer and start her own cosmetics brand one day. But unfortunately, those aspirations were tragically put to an end.

On July 22, 2018, when Wilson and her two sisters were stepping out of the Bay Area Rapid Transit (BART) train in Oakland, California, she was stabbed to death by a white man.

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Some people don't view Pittsburgh's Stephen Foster statue as racist. Those people would be wrong.

Yeah, I'm going there. Stay with me.

The statue, which depicts a borderline caricature of a black musician in tattered clothing playing the banjo at the feet of a regal, well-dressed Stephen Collins Foster — who is often touted as the Father of American Music — will soon be relocated. The city has plans to install in its place a statue of a black woman significant to Pittsburgh's history.

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The concurrent events of the Dakota Access Pipeline protest and Malheur National Wildlife Refuge verdict on Oct. 27, 2016, shed light on our country's history of scrappy rebel underdogs, land disputes, and inequality.

On the same day Native American protesters in North Dakota were attacked by police armed with LRAD sound cannons for standing up to a private oil corporation, a group of insurgent ranchers calling themselves Citizens for Constitutional Freedom (C4CF) were acquitted on federal charges after taking up arms and occupying government property in Oregon.

These two different groups of people each fought back against some incarnation of The Man, but with very different results.

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