17 amazing women who probably aren't in history books, but should be.

Some women won't be found in history books. Don't let them be forgotten.

In 1968, Shirley Chisholm became the first African-American woman elected to Congress in U.S. history. Four years later, she ran for president.

It's a bit embarrassing, but I'll admit that her name didn't immediately ring a bell to me. Growing up, even as a self-described history buff, I don't recall ever seeing Chisholm's name in a textbook. That's a problem.

But that was before I came across Rori, a cartoonist and freelance illustrator, and her "100 Days, 100 Women" project that was inspired by Chisholm's forgotten place in history.

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PBS Victoria

Get ready for every baby girl born in the latter half of 2016 to be named Simone.

Considering the incredible performances of not one but two Olympians named Simone, it's looking like the name itself may forever be equated with success.

Simone Biles (left) and Simone Manuel (right) kicking ass respectively. Photos by Alex Livesey/Getty Images and Kevin C. Cox/Getty Images.

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Serena Williams. Emma Watson. Kerry Washington. These women need no introduction.

By every measure, they are talented, strong, and working at the top of their respective fields. But they didn't achieve their success alone.

That's why they've come together, along with some of the biggest names in Hollywood and athletics, to say thank you to the women who got them there.

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Where were you when Beyoncé made a tall glass of "Lemonade" and shared it with the world?

The superstar's highly anticipated visual album "Lemonade" debuted in mid-late April, but not before her film of the same name premiered on HBO. Through haunting imagery, the captivating poetry of Warsan Shire, and, of course, the music of Queen B herself, fans were gifted a cinematic love letter to black womanhood.

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