Hollywood's brightest stars thank the women who've helped them achieve greatness.

Serena Williams. Emma Watson. Kerry Washington. These women need no introduction.

By every measure, they are talented, strong, and working at the top of their respective fields. But they didn't achieve their success alone.

That's why they've come together, along with some of the biggest names in Hollywood and athletics, to say thank you to the women who got them there.


Image via Lean In/YouTube.

Together Women Can is a public awareness campaign from Lean In and Makers about the power of women supporting each other.

The campaign kicked off with Williams, Watson, Washington, and other stars — including Lena Dunham, Selena Gomez, Abby Wambach, Megyn Kelly, and more — sharing their personal experiences about the role of female mentors. Whether it's a director, friend, producer, or even a sister, these relationships boosted their confidence and helped them reach professional heights they never thought possible.

For Emma Watson, the woman in her corner is acclaimed director and writer Sofia Coppola.

All GIFS via Lean In/YouTube.

Eva Longoria Baston gave a warm thank you to All3 Media executive vice president Nina Lederman.

And Selena Gomez couldn't help but thank her whole squad.

Having strong women in your corner isn't a perk of the rich and famous. Female mentors and allies are something women of all stripes can benefit from.

And the data doesn't lie.

In the workplace, women are given less credit for their work and suggestions. Women are interrupted more, (not just by men) and are often given less time to speak. Women's performance is often underestimated, and we're frequently passed over for raises, promotions, and plum assignments. And when women try to assert themselves or speak more confidently and directly, we often receive pushback for being too aggressive or unlikable, feedback most men wouldn't receive for the same behavior.

That's why it's so vital that women work together and support one another.

While popular culture often pits women as rivals, we know better.

Together we are a force to be reckoned with. We are smart, strong, funny, and fierce. Capable of running the boardroom, the backcourt, or the Broadway stage. When women celebrate each other's accomplishments, mentor and support young women on the rise, and encourage one another, there's nothing we can't do.

At the same time, "leaning in" isn't a silver bullet for solving poverty or ending years of institutional sexism, but forging these relationships in the workplace is the first of many tools we can use to support one another and fight for gender equality.

"Lean In" author and Facebook COO Sheryl Sandberg said it best:

No matter your gender or where you are in your career, we can all do our part to ensure women are heard, respected, and promoted in the workplace.

More voices means better ideas, stronger teams, and improved morale. It's a win for all of us. Because when it comes to equality and changing the status quo:

Watch their powerful messages and #LeanInTogether with the women who lift you up.

Courtesy of Verizon
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If someone were to say "video games" to you, what are the first words that come to mind? Whatever words you thought of (fun, exciting, etc.), we're willing to guess "healthy" or "mental health tool" didn't pop into your mind.

And yet… it turns out they are. Especially for Veterans.

How? Well, for one thing, video games — and virtual reality more generally — are also more accessible and less stigmatized to veterans than mental health treatment. In fact, some psychiatrists are using virtual reality systems for this reason to treat PTSD.

Secondly, video games allow people to socialize in new ways with people who share common interests and goals. And for Veterans, many of whom leave the military feeling isolated or lonely after they lose the daily camaraderie of their regiment, that socialization is critical to their mental health. It gives them a virtual group of friends to talk with, connect to, and relate to through shared goals and interests.

In addition, according to a 2018 study, since many video games simulate real-life situations they encountered during their service, it makes socialization easier since they can relate to and find common ground with other gamers while playing.

This can help ease symptoms of depression, anxiety, and even PTSD in Veterans, which affects 20% of the Veterans who have served since 9/11.

Watch here as Verizon dives into the stories of three Veteran gamers to learn how video games helped them build community, deal with trauma and have some fun.

Band of Gamers www.youtube.com

Video games have been especially beneficial to Veterans since the beginning of the pandemic when all of us — Veterans included — have been even more isolated than ever before.

And that's why Verizon launched a challenge last year, which saw $30,000 donated to four military charities.

And this year, they're going even bigger by launching a new World of Warships charity tournament in partnership with Wargaming and Wounded Warrior Project called "Verizon Warrior Series." During the tournament, gamers will be able to interact with the game's iconic ships in new and exciting ways, all while giving back.

Together with these nonprofits, the tournament will welcome teams all across the nation in order to raise money for military charities helping Veterans in need. There will be a $100,000 prize pool donated to these charities, as well as donation drives for injured Veterans at every match during the tournament to raise extra funds.

Verizon is also providing special discounts to Those Who Serve communities, including military and first responders, and they're offering a $75 in-game content military promo for World of Warships.

Tournament finals are scheduled for August 8, so be sure to tune in to the tournament and donate if you can in order to give back to Veterans in need.

Courtesy of Verizon

via CNN / Twitter

Eviction seemed imminent for Dasha Kelly, 32, and her three young daughters Sharron, 8; Kia, 6; and Imani, 5, on Monday. The eviction moratorium expired over the weekend and it looked like there was no way for them to avoid becoming homeless.

The former Las Vegas card dealer lost her job due to casino closures during the pandemic and needed $2,000 to cover her back rent. The mother of three couldn't bear the thought of being put out of her apartment with three children in the scorching Nevada desert.

"I had no idea what we were going to do," Kelly said, according to KOAT.

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