Instagram / Willow Smith

As Will Smith himself once said, "Parents just don't understand." And that definitely extends to a dad understanding his daughter's period. Jada Pinkett Smith revealed on her show, Red Table Talk, that her husband, Will Smith, is a "joker" and sometimes needs other family members to point out when he goes too far. When it comes to making jokes about the period of Willow, their 19-year-old daughter, she shuts it down immediately.

The actress interviewed T.I. about his controversial comments on his daughter's hymen. T.I. stated that his comments were a "joke," and Pinkett Smith jumped in, saying she kind of understands why a dad might make misinformed comments about his daughter. Her own husband has had his own moments of cluelessness.

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Facebook / Maverick Austin

Your first period is always a weird one. You know it's going to happen eventually, but you're not always expecting it. One day, everything is normal, then BAM. Puberty hits you in a way you can't ignore.

One dad is getting attention for the incredibly supportive way he handled his daughter's first period. "So today I got 'The Call,'" Maverick Austin started out a Facebook post that has now gone viral.

The only thing is, Austin didn't know he got "the call." His 13-year-old thought she pooped her pants. At that age, your body makes no sense whatsoever. It's a miracle every time you even think you know what's going on.

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via Robin Higgins / Pixabay

Let's face it, a lot of guys are a little out of the loop when it comes to understanding women's bodies.

It seems that either they didn't pay much attention in sex education class or maybe they needed to take it for an entire year just to get the basics down. However, in some cases, men aren't taught about these issues at all.

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Though I've had it since I was 10 years old, it took me almost a decade to realize that my period was not normal.

I always noticed that my cramps were very intense prior to my period. I also cycled through extreme mood swings, felt lightheaded, lacked energy, and experienced symptoms of depression. Not the passing, mope-around-in-your-bed-eating-ice-cream emotional slump — this was depression that affected my everyday life. It made me feel like a completely different person. Leading up to my period, my normally confident, capable self gave way to an intensely anxious, harshly self-critical version of me that I hardly recognized.

But as someone who's suffered from depression, anxiety, and IBS throughout my whole life, I thought it was normal. My high school nurse said it was just PMS and stress, and my mother agreed. During my first year of college, I noticed that my symptoms grew even worse. They began affecting my schoolwork and attentiveness. I often felt like I wasn’t really able to respond to my surroundings due to my lack of energy.

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