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Basketball referee has an emotional reunion with the player who saved his life on the court

Not many people survive a "widow maker," but thanks to the player's quick actions, this ref lived to call another game.

heroes; heartwarming videos; heart attack; referee heart attack; widow maker

Basketball referee reunites with player who saved his life.

There are some things people are never quite prepared to experience, and a heart attack is high on that list. Semi-pro basketball referee John Sculli found himself on the receiving end of an unexpected heart attack, right in the middle of reffing a game.

Sculli was keenly watching the game between Toledo Glass City and the Jamestown Jackals when he went from following the players down the court to sprawled out on the ground. He was quickly surrounded by other referees, but his fall got the attention of Myles Copeland, who recognized Sculli was unresponsive and immediately began CPR.

"I had never witnessed someone just collapse, but I knew what had to be done," Copeland told CBS.

Turns out Copeland wasn't just a basketball player, he was also a firefighter, and his quick actions saved Sculli's life. Doctors told the referee and his fiancé, Donna, that he had a "widow maker" heart attack, which is often fatal. So when the two men got a chance to reconnect with Donna in tow, emotions ran high and CBS caught it on video.


After recovering from his quadruple bypass surgery, Sculli met up with Copeland in the very same gym, and the two immediately embraced. Donna began to cry seeing the man who saved her fiancé's life.

"I love you man, you know I love you," Sculli told Copeland as they hugged.

Even though the referee suffered a heart attack on the court, he wanted nothing more than to get back out there. Just eight months after he met the person responsible for saving his life, Sculli once again got to referee the game he loves and Copeland stood courtside to cheer him on. What an amazing full-circle moment between new friends.

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