If you've been living anywhere but under a rock with no TV or internet access for the past several years (if that's you: hello! Welcome to the internet!), then you know that "Hamilton," a diversely-cast musical about the founding fathers and all the dueling they did, is a pop culture sensation the likes of which you only experience once or twice a generation.

And that means everyone wants to see it. But until they turn this thing into a movie — soon, right? — tickets are hard to come by and expensive when they're available. If you want to be in the room where it happens, you're either going to have to shell out a lot of dough or win the lottery. Literally. The show offers a limited number of $10 tickets through a daily raffle.

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Have you ever been in the room where it happens? The actual room where Broadway musicals happen?

Imagine walking into that room. Now imagine seeing Lin-Manuel Miranda sitting there next to other iconic theater legends, waiting for you to begin your audition. It’s the biggest job interview of your life.

You start sweating. You get this random twitch. Dry mouth — you get the driest mouth ever. You forget all your lines.

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Vice President-elect Mike Pence wanted to be in the room where it happens. So he went to see "Hamilton" on Nov. 18, 2016.

But when Pence arrived at the Richard Rodgers Theatre in New York City to see the critically acclaimed hip-hop musical about the life of Alexander Hamilton, he was met with a chorus of boos and jeers (and, for the record, a few scattered claps).

Matthew Anderson, a theater buff visiting New York from Minneapolis said the display before the show was unlike anything he'd seen.

Pence was brought to his seat shortly before the show began.

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A theater teacher played 'Hamilton' for a group of inmates. Their reaction was priceless.

These men are prisoners. But in 'Hamilton,' they saw themselves on stage.

I work with a group of men who aren’t used to seeing themselves in the narrative unless they’re portrayed as villains.

These men are prisoners. They understand that much of America thinks they’re monsters who deserve to be locked in cages. They are the bastard, orphan sons of … every kind of woman you can imagine. They are also beloved sons and husbands and part of close families who come to visit them every week.


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