'Hamilton' won a Tony Award and its creator gave so much love to Orlando.

On the morning of June 12, 2016, America woke up to heartbreak: the largest mass shooting in the country's history at an LGBTQ dance club in Orlando.

What happened is a hate crime, a terrorist attack, and a national tragedy. But on Broadway, as in life, the show must go on. And the Tony Awards, Broadway's annual celebration, filled the stage at the Beacon Theatre in New York City.

Both places, dance clubs and Broadway, have long been safe havens where LGBTQ people have been free to express themselves without judgement. And so while these two events could not be more different, tonight's show holds a special significance. It gives the artists of Broadway a chance to further honor the community that has been a part of them for so long, which was so cruelly targeted in Orlando.


At this year's Tony Awards, Lin-Manuel Miranda's phenomenon "Hamilton" is winning nearly every other award.

He's likely to give many speeches tonight, but his first speech, for best musical score, has already hit the right notes.

When Miranda won big at the Tony Awards in 2008 for "In the Heights," he freestyled his thank-you speech. But tonight demanded something different. So instead, he wrote a sonnet and somehow managed, in just 16 lines, to say everything we needed to hear.

He started by thanking his wife, Vanessa Nadal, but quickly turned his moment of thanks into a poetic tribute on the searing events of the past 24 hours, incorporating the #loveislove rallying cry that's been ricocheting around Twitter all evening in support of the LGBTQ community.

Read his words below:

"My wife’s the reason anything gets done.

She nudges me towards promise by degrees.

She is a perfect symphony of one,

our son is her most beautiful reprise.

We chase the melodies that seem to find us,

until they’re finished songs and start to play,

when senseless acts of tragedy remind us

that nothing here is promised — not one day.

This show is proof that history remembers

we live through times where hate and fear seem stronger.

We rise and fall, and light from dying embers:

remembrances that hope and love last longer.

And love is love is love is love is love

is love is love is love cannot be killed or swept aside.

I sing Vanessa’s symphony, Eliza tells her story.

Now fill the world with music, love, and pride."

Watch his emotional reading here:



Courtesy of CeraVe
True

"I love being a nurse because I have the honor of connecting with my patients during some of their best and some of their worst days and making a difference in their lives is among the most rewarding things that I can do in my own life" - Tenesia Richards, RN

From ushering new life into the world to holding the hand of a patient as they take their last breath, nurses are everyday heroes that deserve our respect and appreciation.

To give back to this community that is always giving so selflessly to others, CeraVe® put out a call to nurses to share their stories for a chance to be featured in Heroes Behind the Masks, a digital content series shining a light on nurses who go above and beyond to provide safe and quality care to patients and their communities.

First up: Tenesia Richards, a labor and delivery nurse working in New York City who, in addition to her regular job, started a community outreach program in a homeless shelter that houses expectant mothers for up to one year postpartum.

Tenesia | Heroes Behind the Masks presented by CeraVe www.youtube.com

Upon learning at a conference that black mothers in the U.S. die at three to four times the rate of white mothers, one of the widest of all racial disparities in women's health, Richards decided to take further action to help her community. She, along with a handful of fellow nurses, volunteered to provide antepartum, childbirth and postpartum education to the women living at the shelter. Additionally, they looked for other ways to boost the spirits of the residents, like throwing baby showers and bringing in guest speakers. When COVID-19 hit and in-person gatherings were no longer possible, Richards and her team found creative workarounds and created holiday care packages for the mothers instead.

Keep Reading Show less

The fasting period of Ramadan observed by Muslims around the world is a both an individual and communal observance. For the individual, it's a time to grow closer to God through sacrifice and detachment from physical desires. For the community, it's a time to gather in joy and fellowship at sunset, breaking bread together after abstaining from food and drink since sunrise.

The COVID-19 pandemic has limited group gatherings in many countries, putting a damper on the communal part of Ramadan. But for one community in Barcelona, Spain, a different faith has stepped up to make the after sunset meal, known as Iftar, as safe as possible for the Muslim community.

According to Reuters, Father Peio Sanchez, Santa Anna's rector, has opened the doors of the Catholic church's open-air cloisters to local Muslims to use for breaking the Ramadan fast. He sees the different faiths coming together as a symbol of civic coexistence.

Keep Reading Show less
Courtesy of CeraVe
True

"I love being a nurse because I have the honor of connecting with my patients during some of their best and some of their worst days and making a difference in their lives is among the most rewarding things that I can do in my own life" - Tenesia Richards, RN

From ushering new life into the world to holding the hand of a patient as they take their last breath, nurses are everyday heroes that deserve our respect and appreciation.

To give back to this community that is always giving so selflessly to others, CeraVe® put out a call to nurses to share their stories for a chance to be featured in Heroes Behind the Masks, a digital content series shining a light on nurses who go above and beyond to provide safe and quality care to patients and their communities.

First up: Tenesia Richards, a labor and delivery nurse working in New York City who, in addition to her regular job, started a community outreach program in a homeless shelter that houses expectant mothers for up to one year postpartum.

Tenesia | Heroes Behind the Masks presented by CeraVe www.youtube.com

Upon learning at a conference that black mothers in the U.S. die at three to four times the rate of white mothers, one of the widest of all racial disparities in women's health, Richards decided to take further action to help her community. She, along with a handful of fellow nurses, volunteered to provide antepartum, childbirth and postpartum education to the women living at the shelter. Additionally, they looked for other ways to boost the spirits of the residents, like throwing baby showers and bringing in guest speakers. When COVID-19 hit and in-person gatherings were no longer possible, Richards and her team found creative workarounds and created holiday care packages for the mothers instead.

Keep Reading Show less