Lin-Manuel Miranda dropped the first trailer for the 'Hamilton' film last night

In less than two weeks, anyone with a DIsney+ subscription will be able to see the filmed version of the original stage production of the hit Broadway show Hamilton. For fans of the show, July 3rd cannot come fast enough. Those who haven't seen it or listened to the soundtrack 800,000 times might take an "Oh, that's nice," attitude, but those people simply don't know what they've been missing.

I'm embarrassed to admit I used to be a Hamilton doubter. I thought it seemed overhyped. I could not have been more wrong. The fact that millions will get to see it now from the comfort of our living rooms is a gift beyond measure.

The only bad news is that Disney + just quietly ended their free 7-day trial. Super crappy move, in my opinion. But you can sign up for just one month for $6.99—less than the cost of a movie ticket—and then cancel after the first month if you don't want to keep the subscription. Seven bucks for a month's worth of Hamilton is a freaking steal.






Last night, a preview of the show dropped on all Hamilton social media pages, including Lin-Manuel Miranda's Twitter. It's just a minute-long taste, but the thrill is real. We don't have to wait for it for much longer.

Miranda, the literal genius behind the show, also answered a few frequently asked questions about the Disney + release on Twitter. People have been wondering exactly what time it's going to be up so they won't miss a second. People have also wanted to know if it's going to be on the platform for a limited time. (Thank the holy heavens it looks like it's going to be there to stay. As in, now we really can watch Hamilton 800,000 times if we want to).

We need this. We all need this. Not just for the entertainment value of it, but for the lens through which the show views our country's complicated history. The arts have a way of cutting straight to the heart of things, making us process reality in a new way, and Hamilton arguably does that better than anything else. Michelle Obama called it the "best piece of art in any form that I have ever seen in my life." I Agree. It's perhaps more relevant than ever in this moment.

The show moves fast, and the more you listen, the better it gets. If you can't wait until July 3rd or want more than that short preview, you can listen to the whole soundtrack on Spotify or for free on YouTube:

Hamilton: An American Musical FULL SOUNDTRACK www.youtube.com

True

If the past year has taught us nothing else, it's that sending love out into the world through selfless acts of kindness can have a positive ripple effect on people and communities. People all over the United States seemed to have gotten the message — 71% of those surveyed by the World Giving Index helped a stranger in need in 2020. A nonprofit survey found 90% helped others by running errands, calling, texting and sending care packages. Many people needed a boost last year in one way or another and obliging good neighbors heeded the call over and over again — and continue to make a positive impact through their actions in this new year.

Upworthy and P&G Good Everyday wanted to help keep kindness going strong, so they partnered up to create the Lead with Love Fund. The fund awards do-gooders in communities around the country with grants to help them continue on with their unique missions. Hundreds of nominations came pouring in and five winners were selected based on three criteria: the impact of action, uniqueness, and "Upworthy-ness" of their story.

Here's a look at the five winners:

Edith Ornelas, co-creator of Mariposas Collective in Memphis, Tenn.

Edith Ornelas has a deep-rooted connection to the asylum-seeking immigrant families she brings food and supplies to families in Memphis, Tenn. She was born in Jalisco, Mexico, and immigrated to the United States when she was 7 years old with her parents and sister. Edith grew up in Chicago, then moved to Memphis in 2016, where she quickly realized how few community programs existed for immigrants. Two years later, she helped create Mariposas Collective, which initially aimed to help families who had just been released from detention centers and were seeking asylum. The collective started out small but has since grown to approximately 400 volunteers.