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Education

Former NICU baby graduates medical school, intends to become NICU doctor

He plans to start a pediatrics residency specializing in infant care.

A former NICU baby is going to become a NICU doctor.

Marcus Mosley was born in 1995 at just 26 weeks gestation, meaning he spent his first few months of life in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU). Now, 27 years later, Mosley has graduated medical school with the intention of specializing in the same kind of medicine that saved his life. He recently graduated from the CUNY School of Medicine at The City College of New York. His journey from being a patient to being a doctor in the NICU is well underway and the future is looking bright.

"It was very frightening when he was born and they told me that he was in the NICU," Mosley's mother, Pauline Mosley told "Good Morning America." "The doctors told me, they just kept giving me all these different percentages of very slim chance of him being normal, like less than 10% chance. They kept saying 90%, he might not be able to see. Eighty to 90%, he would have developmental delays. They didn't know."

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Richard Soliz spent 28 days at Harborview Medical Center and nearly died of COVID-19.

Throughout the pandemic, we've seen countless stories of patients in the ICU, terribly sick with COVID-19, still insisting that the virus isn't real. Such stories of denial are frustrating, especially for healthcare workers who are doing their best to save people's lives.

That's why this story of a COVID patient returning to the hospital to thank—and apologize to—the medical staff who helped him offers a ray of hope that not all who are in denial will stay that way.

According to KOMO News, Richard Soliz hadn't known anyone who had gotten sick from the coronavirus. He had also fallen prey to misinformation on social media about the vaccine, so had chosen not to get vaccinated. Then he fell ill in late August, spiked a fever and found it difficult to breathe.

"That's when I really knew I was in a bad situation," Soliz said. "That's when I knew, hey, this is COVID. Man. I contracted the virus."

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TikTok

Dr. Pamela Mehta goes viral for highlighting gender inequality in the workplace

"Do you plan on having children?" This is absolutely, without a doubt, a very inappropriate question to be asked during a job interview. One that in no way explores a person's work relevant skills, applicable experience or career goals. And it's definitely not a common conversation starter for male applicants. It is however a question that many women, particularly those in male-dominated fields, have to put up with, even now.

Meet orthopedic surgeon, mother and viral TikTok sensation Dr. Pamela Mehta. Mehta receives glowing reviews for her work, and is mother to three children. Yes, she is both—is it that hard to fathom? Apparently, for her former employers, it was.

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Photo by CHUTTERSNAP on Unsplash

When Salem Hospital healthcare workers are feeling stressed, the hospital's wellness department usually recommends yoga or deep breathing. But a year and a half into the COVID-19 pandemic, with a new surge of hospitalizations driven by people who refuse to utilize the freely available vaccine underway, healthcare workers are beyond stressed. They're wiped out, cried out, and burnt out—and yoga and deep breaths just aren't cutting it anymore.

To give employees an outlet for their frustrations, Salem Hospital set up a "rage room" area where workers can take out their anger by throwing dinner plates at a wall.

A Salem Hospital nurse named Lisa told AP News that she and her colleagues had hoped this Delta wave wouldn't hit, but it has. "And it's harder and worse, way worse, than before," she said. Right now they have 15 patients on ventilators and people dying in the ICU.

She said she has made ample use of the plate-smashing booth.

"We put on safety glasses, and we took plates and we shattered them. And I kept going back. I kept going back, and they told me I had enough turns."

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