+
upworthy
More

Someone asked ‘Why is it wrong to fly a straight flag?’ The response is a must-read.

Someone asked ‘Why is it wrong to fly a straight flag?’ The response is a must-read.

Not everyone needs a pride flag of their own. Be grateful for that.

With the ever-growing focus on identity politics, it's only natural that people from groups who have not traditionally been marginalized might begin to wonder where they fit in.

There are movements for gender, ethnic, sexual and religious minorities who are fighting for their rights, and often their very survival, on a daily basis. But what about everyone else?


Is it wrong for white people, heterosexuals and men to have “pride" in their identities?

On one hand, the short answer should be “no, there's nothing wrong with that." Even groups that aren't currently facing prejudice or threats to their identity have a heritage of struggle. Italian, Irish and Jewish Americans are largely lumped into “white culture" in 2018 but their legacy of oppression is very real and not as distant as some might think. And when pride is used for the betterment of all, it can be a powerful, community building tool.

And yet seemingly every example we see today of people wanting “pride" or more focus on powerful, non-marginalized groups seems to stem from those who would mask hatred and division under the guise of community.

Is there a single “white pride" group out there that isn't racist? If so, I certainly haven't heard of them.

This is exactly what happened during the 2016 Election when the forces behind Donald Trump's campaign were able to manipulate the real grievances of poor, white working men and women into a larger campaign of dissent and misinformation. White people, straight people and men do suffer just like everyone else -- but those who seem most focused on highlighting that suffering are doing so with dangerous motives.

Take for example the question over whether there should be a “straight pride" flag to match the iconic rainbow flag. Not only does it sound silly and unnecessary on the surface. If you have any doubts about the merits of a straight pride movement, just look at their flag. There's something inherently unseemly and menacing about it:

So, when someone on Quora posed the question, “Why is it wrong to fly a straight pride flag?" the response was something that is a must-read for everyone, but especially those still not sure why so many marginalized groups are using the power of identity politics to push for greater equality and systemic change:

Context is everything. Intent is everything. As a straight, white man it can sometimes feel like those who fall outside those labels are telling me that my life has been free of struggle and pain. And sure, maybe some people are sending that message and believe it to be true.

But the real message is that most people like me have never had to truly live outside the norms of a society, keeping our true selves hidden and wondering what the very real consequences might be if we were exposed.

Things are improving rapidly for a number of historically marginalized groups. There will be setbacks along the way and it's a learning process for everyone.

Just because straight people don't need a flag of their own isn't a reason to feel left out. It's a reason to feel grateful for the privileges we have enjoyed and to keep working to extend those privileges to everyone.

After that, maybe we can all wave one flag of victory together.

True

Making new friends as an adult is challenging. While people crave meaningful IRL connections, it can be hard to know where to find them. But thanks to one Facebook Group, meeting your new best friends is easier than ever.

Founded in 2018, NYC Brunch Squad brings together hundreds of people who come as strangers and leave as friends through its in-person events.

“Witnessing the transformative impact our community has on the lives of our members is truly remarkable. We provide the essential support and connections needed to thrive amid the city's chaos,” shares Liza Rubin, the group’s founder.

Despite its name, the group doesn’t just do brunch. They also have book clubs, seasonal parties, and picnics, among other activities.

NYC Brunch Squad curates up to 10 monthly events tailored to the specific interests of its members. Liza handles all the details, taking into account different budgets and event sizes – all people have to do is show up.

“We have members who met at our events and became friends and went on to embark on international journeys to celebrate birthdays together. We have had members get married with bridesmaids by their sides who were women they first connected with at our events. We’ve had members decide to live together and become roommates,” Liza says.

Members also bond over their passion for giving back to their community. The group has hosted many impact-driven events, including a “Picnic with Purpose” to create self-care packages for homeless shelters and recently participated in the #SquadSpreadsJoy challenge. Each day, the 100 members participating receive random acts of kindness to complete. They can also share their stories on the group page to earn extra points. The member with the most points at the end wins a free seat at the group's Friendsgiving event.

Keep ReadingShow less
Education

3,700-year-old Babylonian stone tablet gets translated, changes history

They were doing trigonometry 1500 years before the Greeks.

via UNSW

Dr. Daniel Mansfield and his team at the University of New South Wales in Australia have just made an incredible discovery. While studying a 3,700-year-old tablet from the ancient civilization of Babylon, they found evidence that the Babylonians were doing something astounding: trigonometry!

Most historians have credited the Greeks with creating the study of triangles' sides and angles, but this tablet presents indisputable evidence that the Babylonians were using the technique 1,500 years before the Greeks ever were.

Keep ReadingShow less
Family

Mom’s blistering rant on how men are responsible for all unwanted pregnancies is on the nose

“ALL unwanted pregnancies are caused by the irresponsible ejaculations of men. Period. Don't believe me? Let me walk you through it."

Mom has something to say... strongly say.

Members of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, commonly known as Mormons, are a conservative group who aren't known for being vocal about sex.

But best selling author, blogger, and mother of six, Gabrielle Blair, has kicked that stereotype to the curb with a pointed thread on reducing unwanted pregnancies. And her sights are set directly at men.

Keep ReadingShow less
Family

Dad takes 7-week paternity leave after his second child is born and is stunned by the results

"These past seven weeks really opened up my eyes on how the household has actually ran, and 110% of that is because of my wife."

@ustheremingtons/TikTok

There's a lot to be gleaned from this.

Participating in paternity leave offers fathers so much more than an opportunity to bond with their new kids. It also allows them to help around the house and take on domestic responsibilities that many new mothers have to face alone…while also tending to a newborn.

All in all, it enables couples to handle the daunting new chapter as a team, making it less stressful on both parties. Or at least equally stressful on both parties. Democracy!

TikTok creator and dad Caleb Remington, from the popular account @ustheremingtons, confesses that for baby number one, he wasn’t able to take a “single day of paternity leave.”

This time around, for baby number two, Remington had the privilege of taking seven weeks off (to be clear—his employer offered four weeks, and he used an additional three weeks of PTO).

The time off changed Remington’s entire outlook on parenting, and his insights are something all parents could probably use.

Keep ReadingShow less
Science

She tattooed half her face and you'd never know it. Her skills are just that good.

This incredible medical tattoo technology is giving renewed hope to burn victims.

All images via the CBS/YouTube

Basma Hameed runs a tattoo shop, of sorts...


Meet Samira Omar.

The 17-year-old was the victim of a horrific bullying incident.

Keep ReadingShow less
Images via Alan Taylor/Flickr, used with permission.

Updating the kitchen.


Remember those beloved Richard Scarry books?

Books from when you were a kid?

Keep ReadingShow less
Education

Voice recordings of people who were enslaved offer incredible first-person accounts of U.S. history

"The results of these digitally enhanced recordings are arresting, almost unbelievable. The idea of hearing the voices of actual slaves from the plantations of the Old South is as powerful—as startling, really—as if you could hear Abraham Lincoln or Robert E. Lee speak." - Ted Koppel

Library of Congress

When we think about the era of American slavery, many of us tend to think of it as the far distant past. While slavery doesn't exist as a formal institution today, there are people living who knew formerly enslaved black Americans first-hand. In the wide arc of history, the legal enslavement of people on U.S. soil is a recent occurrence—so recent, in fact, that we have voice recordings of interviews with people who lived it.

Keep ReadingShow less