She was fired by the sheriff for being a lesbian. So, she ran for his job and beat him.
via Glitter Beam Radio / Twitter

Last April, Upworthy reported on a case of sweet revenge in Hamilton County, Ohio and after Election Day, it's become even sweeter.

It all began three years ago when Charmaine McGuffey was fired from the Hamilton County Sheriff's Department by Sheriff Jim Neil. McGuffey claims it happened because she raised concerns over abuse of force by fellow officers and the fact she's an openly gay woman.

Neil claims he fired McGuffey for creating a hostile work environment. The lawsuit is still pending in federal court. A trial date has been set for December 7.


"The current sheriff and I got into a pretty serious disagreement about the practice of him not holding officers accountable for use of force and harassment of women, female officers, and female inmates," McGuffey told LGBTQ Nation.

McGuffey didn't just want to beat Neil in court. She decided she would defeat him at the ballot box and take his job, too.

"He fired me. So after about a year or so of contemplating, I decided I can do a better job than him," she continued.

So she ran against him to be the Democratic nominee for Hamilton County Sheriff earlier this year.

Both candidates are Democrats, but Neil lost a lot of support in the party by appearing on stage with Donald Trump at a 2016 rally. He later provided a sorry-not-sorry excuse for his behavior.

"It was selfish on my part because I didn't take into consideration the other candidates on the Democratic ballot that are going to be running with me because this could not just impact my votes, but it could impact the votes on anyone on the Democratic ballot. I want to apologize for my actions," Neil said according to Cincinnati.com.

In the Democratic primary held in April, McGuffey beat Neil in a landslide, winning 70% of the vote.

McGuffey's victory was the best revenge she could have after being fired for what she believes is discrimination. But she had one more race to win before becoming the new Hamilton County Sheriff.

Twitter via CharmMcGuffey / Twitter

Her competition on November 3 was Republican Bruce Hoffbauer. Hoffbauer had an uphill climb as a Republican in a heavily Democratic county. He also had trouble overcoming an incident from his past.

In 1990, while on duty, he shot and killed Walter Brown, a Black man, in the hallway of an apartment complex. Brown had charged at Hoffbauer so he was cleared of wrongdoing. But the city manager later concluded he used excessive force.

McGuffey won endorsements from Senator Sherrod Brown, former Rep. Gabrielle Giffords, and former Cincinnati Mayor Roxanne Qualls. She also didn't shy away from discussing her identity on the campaign trail.

"As a gay woman working in law enforcement, I know what it's like to be targeted for who I am," she said in a campaign ad. "I've seen justice and I've seen injustice. And I know we can do better."


via FOX 19

On Tuesday night, McGuffey pulled off a four-point victory over Hoffbauer with 99% of the county's votes tallied. She became the first female commander at the sheriff's office and the first openly gay sheriff in the county's history.

"This is the honor of a lifetime, a dream job for me," she said at a press conference.

"Remember, when I was 14 and a little girl, I was told 'No way, you can never be a police officer because you're a girl. Because you're a woman.' And look where we stand today?" she continued. "I'm so proud of everyone who made this happen."

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Watch the full story:

Amazon is giving back by fulfilling hundreds of AmazonSmile Charity Lists, and donating essential pantry and food items to help organizations like Bread for the City provide to those disproportionately impacted this year.

Visit AmazonSmile Charity Lists to donate directly to a local charity in your community, or simply shop smile.amazon.com and Amazon will donate a portion of the purchase price of eligible products to your charity of choice.
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True

A lot of people here are like family to me," Michelle says about Bread for the City — a community nonprofit located in Washington DC that provides local residents with food, clothing, health care, social advocacy, and legal services. And since the pandemic began, the need to support organizations like Bread for the City is greater than ever, which is why Amazon is Delivering Smiles to local charities across the country this holiday season.

Watch the full story:

Amazon is giving back by fulfilling hundreds of AmazonSmile Charity Lists, and donating essential pantry and food items to help organizations like Bread for the City provide to those disproportionately impacted this year.

Visit AmazonSmile Charity Lists to donate directly to a local charity in your community, or simply shop smile.amazon.com and Amazon will donate a portion of the purchase price of eligible products to your charity of choice.
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