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After she was fired by the sheriff for being a lesbian she ran for his office and won in a landslide
via Lesbian News / Twitter

Sheriff Jim Neil, 61, and officer Charmaine McGuffey, 62, have known each other for a long time. They both attended the same high school in Cincinnati. They went to the same criminal justice program at University of Cincinnati, and both work at the Hamilton County Sheriff's Office.

Neil was eventually elected sheriff and McGuffey was promoted to Major in Command of jail and court services.

In 2017, Neil fired McGuffey although their reasons for the termination differ. McGuffey claims it happened because she raised concerns over abuse of force by fellow officers and the fact she's an openly gay woman.


Neil claims he fired McGuffey for creating a hostile work environment. The lawsuit is still pending in federal court.

"The current sheriff and I got into a pretty serious disagreement about the practice of him not holding officers accountable for use of force and harassment of women, female officers, and female inmates," McGuffey told LGBTQ Nation.

"He fired me. So after about a year or so of contemplating, I decided I can do a better job than him," she continued. So she ran against him to be the Democratic nominee for Hamilton County Sheriff.

Both candidates are Democrats, however, Neil upset many in his party for appearing on stage with Donald Trump at a 2016 campaign rally. He later provided a sorry-not-sorry for his actions.

"It was selfish on my part because I didn't take into consideration the other candidates on the Democratic ballot that are going to be running with me because this could not just impact my votes, but it could impact the votes on anyone on the Democratic ballot. I want to apologize for my actions," Neil said according to Cincinnati.com.

"I've been a police officer since 1981," he added. "I was elected as sheriff in 2012. I'm still performing as a peace officer. I'm not comfortable in the skin of a politician. What you get with Jim Neil is what you get. I'm a public servant… public safety is my priority."

During the election, Neil was asked whether he acknowledged the disparities in how people of different races were treated in the criminal justice system.

"Sheriff Neil would only respond that he is color blind," Britt Born, a Democratic Party leader said.

"Quite frankly, my opponent has pretended to be a Democrat for many years now, when he's actually much more aligned with the Tea Party Republicans. He tells people what they want to hear and then doesn't follow through," McGuffey said.

In the Democratic primary held Tuesday, McGuffey beat Neil in a landslide. With about three-fourths of the final vote in, she has a 70% lead over Neil.

"[My election] would mean that our country is moving forward," she said before election day, "that we really have moved away from the 1950s model of law enforcement, where not just women are embraced in the law enforcement world, but also LGBTQ members of the community can wear a uniform and be quite successful."

McGuffey will face Republican nominee Bruce Hoffbauer in November and is expected to win.

Pop Culture

She bought the perfect wedding dress that went viral on TikTok. It was only $3.75.

Lynch is part of a growing crowd of newlyweds going against the regular wedding tradition of spending loads of money.

Making a priceless memory.

At first glance, one might think that Jillian Lynch wore a traditional (read: expensive) dress to her wedding. After all, it did look glamorous on her. But this 32-year-old bride has a secret superpower: thrifting.

Lynch posted her bargain hunt on TikTok, sharing that she had been perusing thrift shops in Ohio for four days in a row, with the actual ceremony being only a month away. Lynch then displays an elegant ivory-colored Camila Coelho dress. Fitting perfectly, still brand new and with the tags on it, no less.

You can find that exact same dress on Revolve for $220. Lynch bought it for only $3.75.
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Democracy

A man told me gun laws would create more 'soft targets.' He summed up the whole problem.

As far as I know, there are only two places in the world where people living their lives are referred to as 'soft targets.'

Photo by Taylor Wilcox on Unsplash

Only in America are kids in classrooms referred to as "soft targets."

On the 4th of July, a gunman opened fire at a parade in quaint Highland Park, Illinois, killing at least six people, injuring dozens and traumatizing (once again) an entire nation.

My family member who was at the parade was able to flee to safety, but the trauma of what she experienced will linger. For the toddler with the blood-soaked sock, carried to safety by a stranger after being pulled from under his father's bullet-torn body, life will never be the same.

There's a phrase I keep seeing in debates over gun violence, one that I can't seem to shake from my mind. After the Uvalde school shooting, I shared my thoughts on why arming teachers is a bad idea, and a gentleman responded with this brief comment:

"Way to create more soft targets."

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This article originally appeared on 09.06.17


Being married is like being half of a two-headed monster. It's impossible to avoid regular disagreements when you're bound to another person for the rest of your life. Even the perfect marriage (if there was such a thing) would have its daily frustrations. Funnily enough, most fights aren't caused by big decisions but the simple, day-to-day questions, such as "What do you want for dinner?"; "Are we free Friday night?"; and "What movie do you want to see?"

Here are some hilarious tweets that just about every married couple will understand.

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