Scientists tested a theory of human nature on toddlers. The results are delightful.

You do you.

Since the 18th century, capitalism has been all about the assumption that we humans are fundamentally driven by self-interest.


GIF from "Wall Street."

This idea has become so pervasive that most people just accept it as true. Especially folks in power.

Sure, the thinking goes, we'd like to be nicer and more generous, but that's just not how we're built.

Well, Dr. Felix Warneken is here to prove that one of the biggest assumptions behind capitalism? Yeah. It's wrong. NBD.

Dr. Warneken, now a professor of psychology at Harvard University, developed experiments to suss out what humans — in their early toddler form — are really like.

And the experiments show that, without being asked, kids are moved to help those in need.

Warneken's research shows that we have innately altruistic tendencies. And not only do we want to help our fellow man — we derive joy from it.

The results, captured on video below, are pretty striking (and freaking cute):

GIFs via PBS.

Watch these adorable toddlers crush one of the major myths behind capitalism:

Since Simone Biles backed out of the team final at the Tokyo Olympics two days ago, the question everyone's been asking is "What the heck happened?"

After two botched vaults, Biles took herself out of the competition, later saying, "I had no idea where I was in the air."

Former gymnasts recognized her wording and have taken to social media to explain a condition known as "the twisties." On a basic level, the twisties is a mental state where your muscle memory shuts down in the air mid-twist. It can happen to any gymnast at any time, but is more likely under intense pressure. It might seem like a mental block is not something that could happen to the unrivaled Simone Biles, who routinely performs incredibly well under pressure, but brains are fickle things.

This explanation from former gymnast and diver Catherine Burns lays it out:

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