Remembering one of Alan Rickman's final roles — a student project. To help refugees.

Last year, Alan Rickman teamed up with a tortoise for a very important role.

Specifically, this tortoise.


GIF via OneClickGiving/YouTube.

The goal was to create a viral video to raise money for refugees living in the U.K.

The 30-second video features a teeny-tiny tortoise eating a strawberry — that's it. While the miniature star of the screen chomps away, Rickman — who you may know from his roles as Severus Snape in the Harry Potter series and so much else — provides a voiceover explaining how this all works.

Here's Rickman at the premiere of "Harry Potter and The Deathly Hallows: Part 2" back in 2011. Photo by Ian Gavan/Getty Images.

So how does it work anyway? It's simple, really. You watch the video, and that's it.

The way it works is that the more views the video gets, the more advertising dollars its creator — OneClickGiving, a charity created by students at Oxford University — makes from YouTube. OneClickGiving then donates the ad revenue to Refugee Council and Save the Children. You are helping them raise that money — all just by watching a cute little video. Make sense?

These refugees were crossing through Hungary into Northern Europe. Photo by Christopher Furlong/Getty Images.

This morning, the world learned that Rickman had died at the age of 69. Many are honoring his memory.

There'll be no shortage of tributes circling around the Internet, with fans in mourning and reflection, remembering him for the big roles he played on the stage and screen during his lifetime.

Rickman is joined by Tom Felton, Emma Watson, Daniel Radcliffe, Rupert Grint, and Matthew Lewis at the New York premiere of "Harry Potter And The Deathly Hallows: Part 2" on July 11, 2011. Photo by Stephen Lovekin/Getty Images.

But just one video lets you help the refugees in the process.

Watch and share the video below.

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If the past year has taught us nothing else, it's that sending love out into the world through selfless acts of kindness can have a positive ripple effect on people and communities. People all over the United States seemed to have gotten the message — 71% of those surveyed by the World Giving Index helped a stranger in need in 2020. A nonprofit survey found 90% helped others by running errands, calling, texting and sending care packages. Many people needed a boost last year in one way or another and obliging good neighbors heeded the call over and over again — and continue to make a positive impact through their actions in this new year.

Upworthy and P&G Good Everyday wanted to help keep kindness going strong, so they partnered up to create the Lead with Love Fund. The fund awards do-gooders in communities around the country with grants to help them continue on with their unique missions. Hundreds of nominations came pouring in and five winners were selected based on three criteria: the impact of action, uniqueness, and "Upworthy-ness" of their story.

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Edith Ornelas, co-creator of Mariposas Collective in Memphis, Tenn.

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