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People are sharing the best stories of the kindest things their pets have done for them

Sometimes our furry friends go above and beyond the call of duty.

People and their pets are almost always a winning combo, but pets going above and beyond the call of duty for their humans is the best.

Reddit users are sharing the kindest things their furry friends have done for them, from emotional support to literally saving their lives, and if this doesn't make you say, "Awww" you might want to get your heart checked.

It started with someone sharing a screenshot of a story from Sarah Booth:

"My parents had a dog named Charlie who was absolutely terrified of the vacuum cleaner. But after I was born, any time my mother vacuumed, Charlie would stand steadfast between me and the vacuum cleaner. 'Trembling in every limb,' my mother says, but determined to protect baby-me from the monster."


Aww, right?

Then people started sharing their own stories of amazing pet savior behavior.

"I have a dog that does this! Before the kids were born, she would hide in one of the bedrooms when I was vacuuming. After the kids were born, she’s visibly uncomfortable, but stays in the room to make sure everything is above board with the situation.

"She’s too funny when my daughter has a sleepover with her cousin. The dog gets super excited to be part of the sleepover too. She just smiles as big as she can. She’s dumb as a box of rocks, but she is by far the sweetest and kindest dog I’ve ever had." – NailFin

"My dog would wake me up several times a night by licking my face then lay back down right next to me. I couldn't figure it out and it was starting to irritate me. Several months later I found out I have sleep apnea and he was licking my face every time I stopped breathing." – ResponsibleBasil1966

"My parents owned a boxer when I was not two. They took us to the lake and he would not leave my side or let me go deeper than my ankles. Dempsey was a good boy." – QCFENUPXJL

"In elementary school I had a bad allergy to dogs, which sucked for me because my grandparents had a dog and we visited them every week for half of the year. I used to be sad since I couldn't pet or play with her at all, but she would keep trying to jump on me. There was a chair that my grandparents would vacuum for me before each visit so that I'd have a place to sit without triggering my allergy.

"Eventually, the dog seemed to understand that I couldn't touch her. My grandparents told me that she would stop jumping on that chair, and after a while she did a special 'greeting' for me. While she'd jump up to the other members of my family, she'd pass her favorite ball to me, which was one of the only games I could safely play with her.

"Then I grew out of the allergy, and I finally got to actually play with her." – placeholderNull

"I had a dog who would walk me to the bus stop everyday. One time I missed the bus, and it was raining really hard. I had to walk a few blocks to go get the bus in a other stop. And I tried showing him away so he could go back home and not get so wet. But he followed me to the other bus stop and stayed with me until the bus driver picked me up. It's not much but it was one of the most loyal things a dog has done for me." – theevilhillbilly

"My Dad had an Irish terrier named Ginger. The neighbor had left her baby in a carriage outside the house. The carriage started to roll into the street. Ginger barked and created a ruckus . The lady came outside to save the baby and told my Dad that Ginger had saved her baby." – agedchromosomes

"My dog is terrified of my basement. To the point where if I try to carry him down the stairs, he jumps back and runs away. One time, I was really sick, like to the point where I felt like it was my last ride, and I had to go downstairs to do my laundry as I live alone, and after a violent coughing fit, I hear a small pattering of nails on the wooden steps behind me. I turn to look, and he’s halfway down the stairs, shaking, trying to slowly go down each step, just to be with me. He looked relieved when he saw me, and stopped shaking, and I carried him back upstairs and slept on the floor with him. If I wasn’t already snotty and covered in tears from my illness, I would’ve broken down even more." – Red-XlIl

"When I was two my grandma’s dog saved me from drowning. I had escaped the house early one morning before anyone else had woken up and wandered to the lake and fell in.

"The dog, bell, had seen me leave the house and followed me to the lake. She dragged me out of the lake to the highway that was near by.

"There was a guy who had car trouble seen bell dragging me and came over to her. At first she didn’t allow him to touch me but then realized he wanted to help.

"She watched him closely and they eventually made it back to the house and seen my mom and grandma frantically looking for me. My family was grateful to her." – rx7blue

"Anytime I get really upset my cat starts rubbing herself all over me and pushes for me to sit so she can lay on my lap. Petting her immediately makes me feel better. It’s weird because as soon as she senses that I’m upset she comes to be with me even if she was doing her own thing right before." – Adventurous_Owl6554

"My parents had a cat named Casper when I was 2 years old. We lived in Arizona and Casper and I were out sitting in the lawn with my mother watching me through the window as she did dishes.

"Out of nowhere, Casper begins flipping out. Jumping up and down and hissing and my mom looks closer and sees a rattlesnake headed directly for me about 5 feet away. My mom freaked out and ran for a broom on her way out front. Casper, as terrified as he must’ve been, was provoking the snake and attempting to get it to alter its path. My mom arrived just in time to see Casper get bit and she began hitting and shooing it away with me in her arms.

"Casper died like 30 minutes later and my parents were heartbroken but thankful. Obviously, I don’t remember this, but I love hearing of our heroic Casper who literally gave his life for me." – Ez13zie

"While my dog was out with his dog walker, he wouldn’t join the pack to go home. Just sat at the top of a 6’ bank above a river until a person came to get him. At that point, the person realized there was another dog stuck in the river mud below. She jumped down to rescue the dog, but couldn’t climb back up…so had to grab my dog’s collar to pull herself up (he was a Great Dane).

"I always knew my dog was awesome. Nice to get 3rd party validation." – Guseatsstuff

"In high school I was suicidal as I had a bunch of undiagnosed mental health problems that had accumulated. My one dog who has anxiety herself knew something was wrong. And never let me alone in my room or in the bathroom. If it was just us home she was my shadow if others were in the house she’d always make sure to come check on me. I ended up talking with my parents with everything eventually but until I found the courage to she was like an angel watching over me to keep me safe. She saved my life… she just turned 10 and I don’t know how I’ll cope when she’s gone…" – Alymae_B

Seriously, these animal friends are amazing and prime examples of how pets can add enormous value to our lives. Here's to our furry friends who watch over us and care for us as much as we care for them.

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