New York City reports zero new coronavirus deaths for the first day since the pandemic began
Photo by tom coe on Unsplash

UPDATE: Back in early June NYC reported zero coronavirus deaths, a number that unfortunately was updated as new information came in. This latest update appears to represent a more certain statistic. Even if there's an adjustment, it's clear that New York City has made an incredible evolution from the world's epicenter of the virus to one that has become America's shining light for paving a path forward to all other major cities and locales in how to combat this deadly disease.

According to Bloomberg News, NYC coronavirus deaths peaked at 799 in one day back on April 9th.

"New Yorkers have been the hero of this story, going above and beyond to keep each other safe," City Hall spokeswoman Avery Cohen said in a statement emailed to Bloomberg.

Original story begins below:

New York State reported five deaths statewide on Sunday but didn't specify where those fatalities occurred. The highest number of deaths statewide was reported on April 9, at 799.

New York City has reported a total of 18,670 confirmed Covid-19 deaths and 4,613 probable ones.On Wednesday, for the first time since early March, New York City logged its first day with zero confirmed deaths from COVID-19. For a city that became the nation's biggest coronavirus hotspot by far, with a daily peak of 590 deaths on April 7, that's wonderful news.

There is one caveat, though. According to the New York Daily News, records released by the city showed three "probable" deaths from the virus, which may very well end up being confirmed. Even at that, though, the milestone of zero confirmed deaths in a 24-hour period was met with celebration by officials in the city, which has seen nearly 17,000 confirmed deaths and more than 4,700 probable deaths in the past three months.


Mayor Bill De Blasio also explained in a press conference that the city had also reached three key reopening thresholds on Wednesday in hospital admissions, ICU admissions and testing. According to the New York State website, New York City will begin phase one of reopening on June 8.

"That is very good news," De Blasio said. "Whatever else we're fighting, whatever else we have to overcome, this is what is going to allow us to move forward."

Of course, the virus hasn't disappeared, so this milestone is not a mark on a linear timeline. Public health and infectious disease experts have prepared us for the idea that the pandemic will come in waves, with peaks and valleys and hotspots invariably popping up in different places.

But in some way, that's all the more reason to celebrate when we do have a big dip. We need moments of hope to break up the long battle we're fighting with this virus. After the intensity of lockdowns and the tragedy New York has experienced, having some space to breathe and something to feel happy about feels like a much needed—even if temporary—relief.

Photo courtesy of Capital One
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