L.A. cares about its workers, raises the minimum wage to $15. It's the largest city to do it so far.

Joining Seattle and San Francisco, Los Angeles is the latest city to adopt a $15 minimum wage.

The Los Angeles City Council just passed bill that will raise the minimum wage to $15 an hour by the year 2020.

The council voted 14-1 in favor of raising the minimum wage. Los Angeles will become the largest city in the country with a $15 minimum wage, along with Seattle and San Francisco.

The city's minimum wage will increase to $10.50 in July 2016 and then increase little by little until it reaches $15 an hour by July 2020. Smaller businesses (25 or fewer employees) will have an extra year to prepare for the wage hike ($10.50 in July 2017 with incremental increases up until July 2021).


California's state minimum wage currently sits at $9 an hour and is set to increase to $10 an hour in January.

Protesters, workers, and activists have pushed for a $15 minimum wage in both Los Angeles and the rest of the country.

Last December, the city was home to a massive protest led by health care workers and fast-food employees, along with supporters. Last month, groups around the country came together to make the same demand on a much larger scale.

People fill a street for wage protests Dec. 4, 2014. Photo by Robyn Beck/AFP/Getty Images.

In recent years, a number of cities have taken steps to raise the local minimum wage

Those cities include Seattle ($15), Chicago ($13), Albuquerque ($8.75), Santa Fe ($10.84), San Diego ($11.50), San Francisco ($15), and Oakland ($12.25).

Seattle agreed to increase its minimum wage last June (reaching the $15 an hour point in 2017), and San Francisco voted to raise its wage last November (reaching the $15 an hour point in 2018).

A number of other cities are currently in the process of considering raising their minimum wages, including Portland, Maine ($10.68), New York ($15), Washington, D.C. ($15), Louisville ($9), and Kansas City, Missouri ($15).

There are a lot of falsehoods going around about supposed negative effects a $15 minimum wage would have on the country, but they're nothing more than myths.

The Department of Labor has an excellent breakdown of some of the more common arguments against raising the minimum wage along with some great statistics to support an increase.


With other cities on the verge of taking action on their minimum wage rules, it's clear that the recent Fight for $15 protests are making a difference. Here's hoping this trend continues.

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