More

We asked 15 people why they're fighting for $15 and this is what they said.

Why do you think we need to raise the minimum wage?

We asked 15 people why they're fighting for $15 and this is what they said.
True
SEIU

Around the country, people are marching to raise wages.

The federal minimum wage is just $7.25. Protesters are pushing to more than double it to $15 an hour.

A popular misconception is that minimum-wage employees are just college kids looking for extra spending money. But 89% of people who would benefit from an increased minimum wage are age 20 or older.


Upworthy asked people at the 2015 New York #FightFor15 protest why it's so important to them that we raise the minimum wage. Their responses remain true today.

Like this man, many others believe that people who work full-time shouldn't still end up in poverty.

It reads: "I'm fighting for $15 and a union because no one should work full-time and still live in poverty."

Another common concern was the rising cost of living. This woman puts it clearly:

It reads: "I'm fighting for $15 'cuz the rent won't wait."

Others, like this woman, want to help make the world a better place for future generations.

It reads: "My son just graduated from college. He and all the sons and daughters need a living wage. I hope this movement jump starts a new, vital labor movement."

And to this woman, it's about respect.

It reads: "I'm fighting for $15 to raise America and the economy. I believe we can win for us all. Workers just want to be respected. #FightFor15 #RaiseAmerica"

Home health care workers, adjunct faculty, child care professionals, and others joined in solidarity.

It reads: "We're home health aide workers and we're fighting for $15 because life is expensive."

And like this man says, paying a living wage is the humane thing to do.

It reads: "I'm fighting for $15 because people deserve to live like people, not like animals!"

This home care worker knows how rough it can be trying to support your family on low wages.

It says: "I'm a home care worker. I'm here to fight for a better salary because life is difficult at $10 an hour. I cannot pay all my expenses. I'm a single mom, and it's hard every single day. I think it's very good to be a union member cause I feel support in my life. Thanks."

A plumber chimed in, echoing the comments about supporting a family.

It reads: "I'm a union plumber. I'm here supporting workers for a fair wage of at least $15 per hour. We all have families to support."

And this group from Belgium doesn't think $15 is so much to ask.

It reads: "I'm from Belgium, and the American people deserve $15!"

For many, however, it's as simple as wanting to be able to take care of your family.

It reads: "I #FightFor15 for me and my 6 kids."

It's no surprise that workers everywhere are asking for a living wage. When you adjust for productivity, the minimum wage has actually decreased by 23% since 1968.

According to the Economic Policy Institute, if the minimum wage kept up with the rate of worker productivity, the minimum wage should actually be closer to $18 an hour.

But these protests can't really change anything, right? Wrong.

If it weren't for these efforts in cities like Seattle and San Francisco, it's likely that things would have stayed how they always were. Both cities have recently boosted their minimum wages to $15 an hour — and on April 4, 2016, the governors of California and New York followed suit by raising their states' minimum wages to $15. Because people got out there and made their voices heard, two of the most populous states now sport two of the best worker wages in the country!

Who's to say we can't make this happen nationwide?

Have your own reason to #FightFor15? Tweet your own signs at @Upworthy and share this post to let us know why!

Courtesy of FIELDTRIP
True

The COVID-19 pandemic has disproportionately affected diverse communities due largely in part to social factors such as inadequate access to housing, income, dietary options, education and employment — all of which have been shown to affect people's physical health.

Recognizing that inequity, Harlem-based chef JJ Johnson sought out to help his community maximize its health during the pandemic — one grain at a time.

Johnson manages FIELDTRIP, a health-focused restaurant that strives to bring people together through the celebration of rice, a grain found in cuisines of countless cultures.

"It was very important for me to show the world that places like Harlem want access to more health-conscious foods," Johnson said. "The people who live in Harlem should have the option to eat fresh, locally farmed and delicious food that other communities have access to."

Lack of education and access to those healthy food options is a primary driver of why 31% of adults in Harlem are struggling with obesity — the highest rate of any neighborhood in New York City and 7% higher than the average adult obesity rate across the five boroughs.

Obesity increases risk for heart disease or diabetes, which in turn leaves Harlem's residents — who are 76% Black or LatinX — at heightened risk for complications with COVID-19.

Keep Reading Show less
via KrustyKhajiit / YouTube

Thomas F. Wilson played one of the most recognizable villains in film history, Biff Tannen, in the "Back to the Future" series. So, understandably, he gets recognized wherever he goes for the iconic role.

The attention must be nice, but it has to get exhausting answering the same questions day in and day out about the films. So Wilson created a card that he carries with him to hand out to people that answers all the questions he gets asked on a daily basis.

Keep Reading Show less
Courtesy of FIELDTRIP
True

The COVID-19 pandemic has disproportionately affected diverse communities due largely in part to social factors such as inadequate access to housing, income, dietary options, education and employment — all of which have been shown to affect people's physical health.

Recognizing that inequity, Harlem-based chef JJ Johnson sought out to help his community maximize its health during the pandemic — one grain at a time.

Johnson manages FIELDTRIP, a health-focused restaurant that strives to bring people together through the celebration of rice, a grain found in cuisines of countless cultures.

"It was very important for me to show the world that places like Harlem want access to more health-conscious foods," Johnson said. "The people who live in Harlem should have the option to eat fresh, locally farmed and delicious food that other communities have access to."

Lack of education and access to those healthy food options is a primary driver of why 31% of adults in Harlem are struggling with obesity — the highest rate of any neighborhood in New York City and 7% higher than the average adult obesity rate across the five boroughs.

Obesity increases risk for heart disease or diabetes, which in turn leaves Harlem's residents — who are 76% Black or LatinX — at heightened risk for complications with COVID-19.

Keep Reading Show less

The subject of late-term abortions has been brought up repeatedly during this election season, with President Trump making the outrageous claim that Democrats are in favor of executing babies.

This message grossly misrepresents what late-term abortion actually is, as well as what pro-choice advocates are actually "in favor of." No one is in favor of someone having a specific medical procedure—that would require being involved in someone's individual medical care—but rather they are in favor of keeping the government out of decisions about specific medical procedures.

Pete Buttigieg, who has become a media surrogate for the Biden campaign—and quite an effective one at that—addressed this issue in a Fox News town hall when he was on the campaign trail himself. When Chris Wallace asked him directly about late-term abortions, Buttigieg answered Wallace's questions is the best way possible.

"Do you believe, at any point in pregnancy, whether it's at six weeks or eight weeks or 24 weeks or whenever, that there should be any limit on a woman's right to have an abortion?" Wallace asked.

Keep Reading Show less
via WatchMojo / YouTube

There are two conflicting viewpoints when it comes to addressing culture from that past that contains offensive elements that would never be acceptable today.

Some believe that old films, TV shows, music or books with out-of-date, offensive elements should be hidden from public view. While others think they should be used as valuable tools that help us learn from the past.

Keep Reading Show less