Kristen Stewart asks Jesse Eisenberg insulting questions to prove a point about sexism in the media.

Imagine you can ask Kristen Stewart ANY question you want. Ready? Go!

Photo by Ian Gavan/Getty Images.


Here are some reasonable choices:

  1. What's your favorite role you've ever played?
  2. What was it like working with Jodie Foster on "Panic Room" and who are the actresses you look up to the most?
  3. Which script was funnier, "Adventureland" or "Breaking Dawn ā€” Part 2"?

Sadly, all entertainment reporters seem to care about is:

  1. Who are you dating?
  2. No, but seriously, who are you dating?
  3. C'mon, tell us who you're dating!

A person can only take so many questions about Robert Pattinson, am I right?

But this is just the way it is for most actresses. While Stewart's male costars get insightful interview questions about career and craft, women are forced to talk about their latest hairstyle and walk the "manicure runway" ā€” yep, that's a real thing.

But! In a new skit from Funny or Die, Kristen Stewart gets a little revenge by turning these sexist interview questions on Jesse Eisenberg, her costar in "American Ultra."

In the hilarious video, Jesse and Kristen sit down to interview each other, only to find out they've been given each other's question cards.


All GIFs via Funny or Die.

Things get interesting when Kristen starts asking Jesse all kinds of inane questions usually reserved for, well, her.

"Levi's," Eisenberg says. But "I don't know if that's a person."

Stewart moves on to the next question, a classic:

Eisenberg, shockingly, is not with child.

And, of course, no interview of a Hollywood actress would be complete without at least one mention of breasts:

Finally, Eisenberg's had enough.

"I just feel like a lot of the questions you're asking me feel like they're ... not about the movie," he says.

Exactly!

There's a difference between trying to humanize an actress and reducing her to the most basic of female stereotypes.

Sticking only to questions about the movie or her career could probably get a little boring, but how about we show a little creativity and insight? How about we go a little deeper than what dress she's wearing or whether she feels like her biological clock is ticking?

Or, at the very least, how about we start subjecting men to the same kinds of vapid interviews women have endured for so long?

If this video with Kristen Stewart and Jesse Eisenberg is any indication, this kind of red carpet equality is long overdue:

Photo courtesy of Justin Sather
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Upworthy and GoFundMe are celebrating ideas that make the world a better, kinder place. Visit upworthy.com/kindness to join the largest collaboration for human kindness in history and start your own GoFundMe.

While most 10-year-olds are playing Minecraft, riding bikes, or watching YouTube videos, Justin Sather is intent on saving the planet. And it all started with a frog blanket when he was a baby.

"He carried it everywhere," Justin's mom tells us. "He had frog everything, even a frog-themed birthday party."

In kindergarten, Justin learned that frogs are an indicator species ā€“ animals, plants, or microorganisms used to monitor drastic changes in our environment. With nearly one-third of frog species on the verge of extinction due to pollution, pesticides, contaminated water, and habitat destruction, Justin realized that his little amphibian friends had something important to say.

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While it was his love of frogs that led him to understand how important the species are to our ecosystem, it wasn't until he read the children's book What Do You Do With An Idea by Kobi Yamada that Justin-the-activist was born.

Inspired by the book and with his mother's help, he set out on a mission to raise funds for frog habitats by selling toy frogs in his Los Angeles neighborhood. But it was his frog art which incorporated scientific facts that caught people's attention. Justin's message spread from neighbor to neighbor and through social media; so much so that he was able to raise $2,000 for the non-profit Save The Frogs.

And while many kids might have their 8th birthday party at a laser tag center or a waterslide park, Justin invited his friends to the Ballona wetlands ecological preserve to pick invasive weeds and discuss the harms of plastic pollution.

Justin's determination to save the frogs and help the planet got a massive boost when he met legendary conservationist Dr. Jane Goodall.

Photo courtesy of Justin Sather

At one of her Roots and Shoots youth initiative events, Dr. Goodall was so impressed with Justin's enthusiasm for helping frogs, she challenged the young activist to take it one step further and focus on plastic pollution as well. Justin accepted her challenge and soon after was featured in an issue of Bravery Magazine dedicated to Jane Goodall.

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