Netflix viewers can't believe they hadn't heard about her 'secret' hack for finding shows

There are nearly 6,000 movies and TV shows on Netflix but it often feels like I keep scrolling through the same titles over and over again. I find myself constantly asking, "Where are they hiding the rest of their content?"

TikTok user @caseyyisfetchh is going viral because she learned a hack that allows you to search for super-specific movies and TV shows, unlocking thousands of titles that you never would have found before.

"I was today years old when I learned that Netflix has secret codes that bring you into sub-genres that don't' show up in your search feed," the TikTokker says.


The insane thing is that every Netflix user should know about these codes. But in the ten years that I've had the service, I've never heard about them. Why was the world keeping this a secret? Why was Netflix hiding all this great content?

How many nights have I given up searching for a show on Netflix and went to bed when I could have stayed up late binging on foreign horror films?

Take a deep dive into the codes you'll see they get really specific. On a full moon, instead of searching for horror movies and praying to find a good Wolfman flick, you can now put 75930 to see a list of werewolf horror movies.

Do you have a deep love for Turkish cinema? No problem. Just enter 1133133. Like sports movies, but only if they're about soccer? Enter 12549 into the search bar. It's also great for people with children because you can search by age-range — 5455 shows you films that are for kids ages five to seven.

The codes are also great for folks who love watching seasonal fare. Netflix has codes for 13 different types of Christmas movies.

The codes also reveal that Netflix has a much broader selection of classic films than they normally show during search. They're also a great way for you to expand your film palette and try out new movie genres that you never would have seen otherwise.



The codes work whether you're searching for something to watch on your desktop computer or using the search bar on your smart TV. The best results on a desktop computer come if you're logged in to your Netflix account and click the links on the Netflix Codes website.

You can find a full list of the codes here.

So now, instead of asking your significant other "In the mood for a comedy tonight?" You can ask, "In the mood for a mockumentary?"

Once I finish typing up this article I'm going to do a deep dive into some of my favorite sub-genres and add a ton of movies to My List. From the looks of it, I'll be able to find enough fun stuff to keep me entertained until we reach herd immunity.

Photo courtesy of Justin Sather
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While most 10-year-olds are playing Minecraft, riding bikes, or watching YouTube videos, Justin Sather is intent on saving the planet. And it all started with a frog blanket when he was a baby.

"He carried it everywhere," Justin's mom tells us. "He had frog everything, even a frog-themed birthday party."

In kindergarten, Justin learned that frogs are an indicator species – animals, plants, or microorganisms used to monitor drastic changes in our environment. With nearly one-third of frog species on the verge of extinction due to pollution, pesticides, contaminated water, and habitat destruction, Justin realized that his little amphibian friends had something important to say.

"The frogs are telling us the planet needs our help," says Justin.

While it was his love of frogs that led him to understand how important the species are to our ecosystem, it wasn't until he read the children's book What Do You Do With An Idea by Kobi Yamada that Justin-the-activist was born.

Inspired by the book and with his mother's help, he set out on a mission to raise funds for frog habitats by selling toy frogs in his Los Angeles neighborhood. But it was his frog art which incorporated scientific facts that caught people's attention. Justin's message spread from neighbor to neighbor and through social media; so much so that he was able to raise $2,000 for the non-profit Save The Frogs.

And while many kids might have their 8th birthday party at a laser tag center or a waterslide park, Justin invited his friends to the Ballona wetlands ecological preserve to pick invasive weeds and discuss the harms of plastic pollution.

Justin's determination to save the frogs and help the planet got a massive boost when he met legendary conservationist Dr. Jane Goodall.

Photo courtesy of Justin Sather

At one of her Roots and Shoots youth initiative events, Dr. Goodall was so impressed with Justin's enthusiasm for helping frogs, she challenged the young activist to take it one step further and focus on plastic pollution as well. Justin accepted her challenge and soon after was featured in an issue of Bravery Magazine dedicated to Jane Goodall.

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This article originally appeared on 08.30.14


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