Kesha's got some solid tips for beating the holiday blues.

If you have a tough time getting through the holidays, Kesha's got some great advice.

The past few years have been a bumpy ride for the singer-songwriter — largely sidelined while she battled producer Lukasz "Dr. Luke" Gottwald, who she maintains sexually assaulted her, in court — but Kesha Rose Sebert emerged as a true force to be reckoned with in 2017. In August, she released "Rainbow," her first album since 2012, to absolutely rave reviews. A month prior, she opened up about using her art as an outlet to cope with depression and an eating disorder.

Despite the triumphant year, she, like millions around the world, struggles around the holidays.


Kesha's message is simple: Give yourself a break, avoid falling into "shame spirals," and do what you need to in order to feel OK.

"The holiday season is supposed to be the most festive and fun time of the year, but sometimes, it can quickly become a stressful and emotional time," she began her tweet, drawing on an essay she wrote in Time.

"This is especially true for those of us who struggle with mental illness — be it depression, anxiety, addiction, or any other challenges."

"I've developed a mantra: It's not selfish to take time for yourself," she tweeted, offering up a list of self-care suggestions, including things like going for a walk, having a chat with a therapist, or practicing meditation.

"It's not your responsibility to try to make the whole world happy."

She stressed the importance of resisting the feeling that you should be obligated to feel happy around the holidays. Sometimes, people just aren't, and that's OK. What's important is to avoid falling into a shame cycle.

"It's just another day — don't put unrealistic expectations on it, and don't beat yourself up," she adds.

Whatever your reason for feeling a bit down in the dumps — whether, like Kesha, you recently lost a loved one, or you're just not able to get into the holiday spirit — try to give yourself a well-deserved break.

If you're struggling, it's important to know that you're not alone.

Back in 2015, Tim Lawrence wrote a thoughtful story about some of the struggles people face around this time of the year and what to do about it. In 2013, Time published a story by health writer Alexandra Sifferlin with some additional tips. If you're not feeling so great, it's good to remember just how extremely common this is. You're never, ever alone.

If you're feeling suicidal or are otherwise in need of immediate help, remember that groups like Crisis Text Line (text START to 741741) and the National Suicide Prevention Hotline (800-273-8255). They are there 24/7 if you need them.

True

If the past year has taught us nothing else, it's that sending love out into the world through selfless acts of kindness can have a positive ripple effect on people and communities. People all over the United States seemed to have gotten the message — 71% of those surveyed by the World Giving Index helped a stranger in need in 2020. A nonprofit survey found 90% helped others by running errands, calling, texting and sending care packages. Many people needed a boost last year in one way or another and obliging good neighbors heeded the call over and over again — and continue to make a positive impact through their actions in this new year.

Upworthy and P&G Good Everyday wanted to help keep kindness going strong, so they partnered up to create the Lead with Love Fund. The fund awards do-gooders in communities around the country with grants to help them continue on with their unique missions. Hundreds of nominations came pouring in and five winners were selected based on three criteria: the impact of action, uniqueness, and "Upworthy-ness" of their story.

Here's a look at the five winners:

Edith Ornelas, co-creator of Mariposas Collective in Memphis, Tenn.

Edith Ornelas has a deep-rooted connection to the asylum-seeking immigrant families she brings food and supplies to families in Memphis, Tenn. She was born in Jalisco, Mexico, and immigrated to the United States when she was 7 years old with her parents and sister. Edith grew up in Chicago, then moved to Memphis in 2016, where she quickly realized how few community programs existed for immigrants. Two years later, she helped create Mariposas Collective, which initially aimed to help families who had just been released from detention centers and were seeking asylum. The collective started out small but has since grown to approximately 400 volunteers.