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Kesha's got some solid tips for beating the holiday blues.

'It's not selfish to take time for yourself.'

If you have a tough time getting through the holidays, Kesha's got some great advice.

The past few years have been a bumpy ride for the singer-songwriter — largely sidelined while she battled producer Lukasz "Dr. Luke" Gottwald, who she maintains sexually assaulted her, in court — but Kesha Rose Sebert emerged as a true force to be reckoned with in 2017. In August, she released "Rainbow," her first album since 2012, to absolutely rave reviews. A month prior, she opened up about using her art as an outlet to cope with depression and an eating disorder.

Despite the triumphant year, she, like millions around the world, struggles around the holidays.


Kesha's message is simple: Give yourself a break, avoid falling into "shame spirals," and do what you need to in order to feel OK.

"The holiday season is supposed to be the most festive and fun time of the year, but sometimes, it can quickly become a stressful and emotional time," she began her tweet, drawing on an essay she wrote in Time.

"This is especially true for those of us who struggle with mental illness — be it depression, anxiety, addiction, or any other challenges."

"I've developed a mantra: It's not selfish to take time for yourself," she tweeted, offering up a list of self-care suggestions, including things like going for a walk, having a chat with a therapist, or practicing meditation.

"It's not your responsibility to try to make the whole world happy."

She stressed the importance of resisting the feeling that you should be obligated to feel happy around the holidays. Sometimes, people just aren't, and that's OK. What's important is to avoid falling into a shame cycle.

"It's just another day — don't put unrealistic expectations on it, and don't beat yourself up," she adds.

Whatever your reason for feeling a bit down in the dumps — whether, like Kesha, you recently lost a loved one, or you're just not able to get into the holiday spirit — try to give yourself a well-deserved break.

If you're struggling, it's important to know that you're not alone.

Back in 2015, Tim Lawrence wrote a thoughtful story about some of the struggles people face around this time of the year and what to do about it. In 2013, Time published a story by health writer Alexandra Sifferlin with some additional tips. If you're not feeling so great, it's good to remember just how extremely common this is. You're never, ever alone.

If you're feeling suicidal or are otherwise in need of immediate help, remember that groups like Crisis Text Line (text START to 741741) and the National Suicide Prevention Hotline (800-273-8255). They are there 24/7 if you need them.

All images provided by Adewole Adamson

It begins with more inclusive conversations at a patient level

True

Adewole Adamson, MD, of the University of Texas, Austin, aims to create more equity in health care by gathering data from more diverse populations by using artificial intelligence (AI), a type of machine learning. Dr. Adamson’s work is funded by the American Cancer Society (ACS), an organization committed to advancing health equity through research priorities, programs and services for groups who have been marginalized.

Melanoma became a particular focus for Dr. Adamson after meeting Avery Smith, who lost his wife—a Black woman—to the deadly disease.

melanoma,  melanoma for dark skin Avery Smith (left) and Adamson (sidenote)

This personal encounter, coupled with multiple conversations with Black dermatology patients, drove Dr. Adamson to a concerning discovery: as advanced as AI is at detecting possible skin cancers, it is heavily biased.

To understand this bias, it helps to first know how AI works in the early detection of skin cancer, which Dr. Adamson explains in his paper for the New England Journal of Medicine (paywall). The process uses computers that rely on sets of accumulated data to learn what healthy or unhealthy skin looks like and then create an algorithm to predict diagnoses based on those data sets.

This process, known as supervised learning, could lead to huge benefits in preventive care.

After all, early detection is key to better outcomes. The problem is that the data sets don’t include enough information about darker skin tones. As Adamson put it, “everything is viewed through a ‘white lens.’”

“If you don’t teach the algorithm with a diverse set of images, then that algorithm won’t work out in the public that is diverse,” writes Adamson in a study he co-wrote with Smith (according to a story in The Atlantic). “So there’s risk, then, for people with skin of color to fall through the cracks.”

Tragically, Smith’s wife was diagnosed with melanoma too late and paid the ultimate price for it. And she was not an anomaly—though the disease is more common for White patients, Black cancer patients are far more likely to be diagnosed at later stages, causing a notable disparity in survival rates between non-Hispanics whites (90%) and non-Hispanic blacks (66%).

As a computer scientist, Smith suspected this racial bias and reached out to Adamson, hoping a Black dermatologist would have more diverse data sets. Though Adamson didn’t have what Smith was initially looking for, this realization ignited a personal mission to investigate and reduce disparities.

Now, Adamson uses the knowledge gained through his years of research to help advance the fight for health equity. To him, that means not only gaining a wider array of data sets, but also having more conversations with patients to understand how socioeconomic status impacts the level and efficiency of care.

“At the end of the day, what matters most is how we help patients at the patient level,” Adamson told Upworthy. “And how can you do that without knowing exactly what barriers they face?”

american cancer society, skin cacner treatment"What matters most is how we help patients at the patient level."https://www.kellydavidsonstudio.com/

The American Cancer Society believes everyone deserves a fair and just opportunity to prevent, find, treat, and survive cancer—regardless of how much money they make, the color of their skin, their sexual orientation, gender identity, their disability status, or where they live. Inclusive tools and resources on the Health Equity section of their website can be found here. For more information about skin cancer, visit cancer.org/skincancer.

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