On Feb. 22, "Law & Order: SVU" actress Mariska Hargitay tweeted out a powerful message of support for pop singer Kesha.

If you haven't heard, the pop star is currently dealing with some difficult legal troubles involving her alleged abuser — a producer who works for the record label she's signed to. So Hargitay — a committed, vocal advocate for victims of sexual assault — sent love Kesha's way by tweeting an encouraging message to her more than 700,000 followers.

The tweet — which has been Liked and retweeted thousands of times — may be just a tweet. But it's the latest sign that Hollywood is rallying around someone who certainly deserves support right now.


Kesha filed a suit in 2014 against Dr. Luke, the man who runs her record label, for allegedly drugging her, raping her, and emotionally abusing her for years.

The details about the case, which is still pending, are tough to swallow. But it boils down to a man in a powerful position allegedly using his influence to manipulate and abuse the now-28-year-old, dating back to when she was just a teen.

Photo by Jason Kempin/Getty Images.

This past Friday, Kesha got bad news regarding the case. A judge denied her request to record music outside her contract with Dr. Luke's label until the case is finalized. She's able to work with different producers at the label, but Kesha argued that doing so would mean her music might not be promoted by Sony (the company that owns the label) the same way, thus harming her career and ability to earn income. The denial of that request means Kesha is being forced to work on her alleged abuser's label, unless she accepts significant career setbacks.

After Friday's hearing, though, it seemed like the whole Internet threw its weight behind Kesha, including several celebrities.

The hashtag #FreeKesha began trending, with messages of support for the pop star flooding newsfeeds near and far.

Lady Gaga was blown away by Kesha's courage.


Sara Bareilles had lots of love to share.


Wale wanted to make sure Kesha makes it through this dark time by shining brightly.


Rowan Blanchard threw some much-deserved shade at an unjust legal system.

Jack Antonoff offered support by lending his talents.


Joey Graceffa made it clear he was also upset over the news.


Lily Allen apologized on behalf of an unfair world.

Halsey was totally fed up with the situation.

Ariana Grande said a whole lot with just one purple heart.


Kelly Clarkson tried very hard not to say anything too harsh.


And Lorde sent some much-needed positive vibes Kesha's way.


It's great to see an outpouring of love for Kesha. Because what Hartigay said is right — speaking out can be the hardest part.

Although we've made progress, this is an issue that isn't being discussed enough. Far too many women and girls are raped or sexually assaulted — a 2015 study found that 1 in 5 female college students reported experiencing sexual assault at some point during their years in college. But due to stigma and shame on the issue, many don't come forward. And those numbers are often even lower for male victims of sexual assault.

It's easy to understand why. When survivors are often blamed for their assaults or labeled as liars, it's no wonder many fear opening up about their own experiences.

This is why Kesha deserves all this love (and so much more).

Photo by Christopher Polk/Getty Images for MTV.

Need help? You can call RAINN (Rape, Abuse and Incest National Network) 800-656-HOPE (4673) to speak with a trained professional.

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