Inspired by his family, Misha Collins is fighting homelessness for a very personal reason.

'That's the best moment. Right there. So why not wish for that?'

Inspired by his family, Misha Collins is fighting homelessness for a very personal reason.

"Supernatural" actor Misha Collins may have come up short in his tongue-in-cheek quest to raise half a billion dollars to buy Congress' browser history earlier this year, but that minor setback hasn't stopped him from continuing to raise money and awareness for important issues through his Random Acts charity.

In launching the new "I Wish for This" anti-homelessness campaign, Collins strikes a more serious tone, sharing a bit of his personal history.

"I remember what it's like to be a homeless kid wishing for a warm, safe place to sleep," Collins wrote on Facebook.


"I remember wishing for a warm, dry place to sleep," he continued. "Though we had a great childhood full of adventures and our mom loved us fiercely, sometimes our family simply didn't have the money to put a roof over our heads and from time to time we found ourselves homeless and sleeping in a tent."

The #IWishForThis campaign is particularly close to my heart, guys... I remember what it's like to be a homeless kid...

Posted by Misha Collins on Tuesday, November 21, 2017

There's a heartwarming story behind the campaign's name involving his daughter, a dandelion, and a wish.

In a video posted to YouTube, Collins explains how his daughter Maison helped inspire the the campaign. Collins, Maison, and his son West were taking turns blowing dandelion seeds into the air, making wishes, and when it came to Maison's turn, she simply blew on the flower and announced, "I wish for this," Collins recounts.

"It's such a beautiful reminder," Collins says, choking back happy tears. "That's the best moment. Right there. So why not wish for that?"

GIFs from Misha Collins/YouTube.

Every family should have "this," those moments of innocent beauty and comfortable togetherness. Every family should have a place to live.

You can support the "I Wish for This" initiative by buying T-shirts, phone cases, and bracelets on the campaign's website. All profits go toward Random Acts and Lydia Place, a charity dedicated to disrupting the cycle of homelessness.

You can watch Collins explain the campaign's origin story below:

Photo by Louis Hansel on Unsplash
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This story was originally shared on Capital One.

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