Got an itch to travel more? Research shows why you should go for it.
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Expedia+

Want to jumpstart your creativity and brainpower and feel more alive?

Raises hand. Wouldn't that be nice?

Studies suggest a way to do just that: No, it's not by drinking copious amounts of coffee. It's by going somewhere else. Get out of here!


Image via iStock.

Traveling has the power to make you feel happier and more creative. It can be just the recharge you need. But when you look beyond the passport stamps and Instagram likes, you find it goes even deeper than that.

Traveling can make a person more tolerant and more trusting. Research suggests that it can affect your overall personality too. When Julia Zimmermann and Franz Neyer did a study on a large group of German college students who studied abroad versus those who did not, they found evidence that extended travel can influence personality development. For instance, participants in their study who traveled showed an increase in openness to experience, agreeableness, and overall emotional stability.

It makes sense. When you're trying new things and engaging in new experiences, you're pushed to solve problems in different ways and gain perspective on life. You learn to confront your prejudices, embrace differences, and roll with the punches.

Your experiences mold who you are.

Expedia makes it easy and affordable to foster those experiences.

Image via iStock.

Expedia is a one-stop shop for all things travel. From flights, hotels, and rental cars to cruises, vacation rentals, activities, and entire vacation packages, they can help you easily plan for your next adventure. (The only thing they can't do is put up your "Out of Office" for you.)

And, with their rewards program, Expedia+, you earn points on your travel and can then redeem those points for future travel — aka you can save money and go more places! And they don't believe in blackout dates, so you can redeem your points when and how you like. Or you can even choose to donate your points to an awesome charity, like St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital.

Whatever the case, Expedia wants you to experience the life you want.

Maybe you want to go somewhere with views from above...

Image via iStock.

... or maybe you'd rather be down below.

Image via iStock.

You can explore more landlocked areas...  

Image via Christof Stache/Getty Images.

... or not.

Image via iStock.

Maybe you want to feel the vibrant energy from a city ...

Image via iStock.

... or leave it all behind and take a deep breath.

Image via iStock.

There's beauty all around us — even in places you'd least expect.

Solar energy panels in Germany. Look at the patterns! Image via Sean Gallup/Getty Images.

Traveling helps us to open our minds and see how big our world is.

You can discover new activities in a big city or practice self-care in a remote location. You can immerse yourself in an unfamiliar culture to understand a different way of life. You can travel to a different town, or state, or country, or the world's biggest mountain.

Image via iStock.

Whatever adventure you crave and wherever it happens to be, it's nice to know Expedia will have your back. A comforting presence while navigating the unknown, with added perks as you collect rewards ... to then do it again!

Don't know where to go? You can search more than a million flights, hotels, and packages. You'll find something. And when you do, it'll be just what you needed.

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