Christian Louboutin's new definition of 'nude' is pretty great.

Christian Louboutin just released a new set of nude shoes.

Next time you're at your local pharmacy, take a look down the makeup aisle and you might notice something: For every one color made to match the skin of people darker than sheets of notebook paper, there are half a dozen colors that cater to people who are variations of white.

In a lot of places — and especially in the fashion world — being white is considered the default. "Nude" is synonymous with "white." And that's what makes this trendsetter's new line so exciting.


Fashion designer Christian Louboutin is renowned for creating inspiring, iconic footwear — and his latest line is making news for a really interesting reason: It's accurate.

"Nude" no longer means "white" in the world of Louboutin shoes. Instead, it means seven shades ranging from "porcelain" to "deep chocolate." This is an increase beyond the brand's past color offerings, which were limited to just five shades. 

OK, but why does this matter? Because we really need to work to get the idea of "white as the normal" out of our heads.

The campaign's tagline is "A nude for every woman," and that's really what it's all about. By embracing diversity, we can understand a fuller, more well-rounded story of who we are as humanity. Nobody should feel excluded from something as simple as finding shoes that match on the basis of their skin tone.

White is the default only for as long as we make it that.

Most of us probably can't afford to go out and pick up a new pair of Loubouotin's at the drop of a hat, but here's where this decision extends beyond the brand: Others are sure to follow.

Maybe a pair of Louboutin shoes will always be out of your price range, but that's OK because, given the brand's influence on the fashion world, it's almost certain to inspire others to enact similar diversity-boosting changes as well.

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