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Christian Louboutin's new definition of 'nude' is pretty great.

Christian Louboutin just released a new set of nude shoes.

Next time you're at your local pharmacy, take a look down the makeup aisle and you might notice something: For every one color made to match the skin of people darker than sheets of notebook paper, there are half a dozen colors that cater to people who are variations of white.

In a lot of places — and especially in the fashion world — being white is considered the default. "Nude" is synonymous with "white." And that's what makes this trendsetter's new line so exciting.


Fashion designer Christian Louboutin is renowned for creating inspiring, iconic footwear — and his latest line is making news for a really interesting reason: It's accurate.

"Nude" no longer means "white" in the world of Louboutin shoes. Instead, it means seven shades ranging from "porcelain" to "deep chocolate." This is an increase beyond the brand's past color offerings, which were limited to just five shades. 

OK, but why does this matter? Because we really need to work to get the idea of "white as the normal" out of our heads.

The campaign's tagline is "A nude for every woman," and that's really what it's all about. By embracing diversity, we can understand a fuller, more well-rounded story of who we are as humanity. Nobody should feel excluded from something as simple as finding shoes that match on the basis of their skin tone.

White is the default only for as long as we make it that.

Most of us probably can't afford to go out and pick up a new pair of Loubouotin's at the drop of a hat, but here's where this decision extends beyond the brand: Others are sure to follow.

Maybe a pair of Louboutin shoes will always be out of your price range, but that's OK because, given the brand's influence on the fashion world, it's almost certain to inspire others to enact similar diversity-boosting changes as well.

All photos courtesy of Albertsons
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Summer is officially over, which means we’re looking for any excuse to get together and watch a game or grill outside in the cooling temperatures.

The thing about hosting though is figuring out what to feed your guests—especially with rising prices all around. And frankly, everyone is sick of pizza.

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Celine Dion spoke directly to her fans on social media.

Celine Dion has shared the devastating news that she has been diagnosed with a rare neurological disorder called stiff person syndrome.

In an emotional video to her fans, the 54-year-old French-Canadian singer apologized for taking so long to reach out and explained that her health struggles have been difficult to talk about.

"As you know, I have always been an open book, and I wasn't ready to say anything before. But I'm ready now."

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A tiger at the Endangered Animal Rescue Sanctuary and a mugshot of Joe Exotic from Santa Rosa County Jail.

Netflix’s “Tiger King” will go down in history as the collective distraction that helped America get through the dark, depressing days of early COVID-19 lockdowns. The show followed the true story of the feud between private zoo owner Joe Exotic, the self-described “gay, gun-carrying, redneck with a mullet,” and Carole Baskin, founder of Big Cat Rescue.

Exotic is currently serving out a 21-year prison sentence for animal rights abuses and hiring someone to kill Baskin.

The show was a raucous look inside the world of big cat owners and brought a lot of attention to the animal abuse that runs rampant in the industry. The light it shed on the industry was so bright it led Congress to take action. The Senate unanimously passed the Big Cat Public Safety Act on December 6. The House had already passed the bill in July.

The White House has signaled that President Biden will sign the bill into law.

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Tenacious D performs at the Rock in Pott festival.

The medley that closes out the second side of the Beatles’ “Abbey Road” album is one of the most impressive displays of musicianship in the band’s storied career. It also provided the perfect send-off before the band’s official breakup months later, ending with the lyrics, “And in the end, the love you take is equal to the love you make.”

In 1969, “Abbey Road” was the last record the group made together, although “Let it Be,” recorded earlier that year, was released in 1970.

At first, the medley was just a clever way for the band to use a handful of half-finished tunes, but when it came together it was a rousing, grandiose affair.

Arranged by Paul McCartney and producer George Martin, the medley weaves together five songs written by McCartney, "You Never Give Me Your Money," "She Came in Through the Bathroom Window," "Golden Slumbers," "Carry That Weight” and "The End," and three by John Lennon, “Sun King," "Mean Mr. Mustard" and "Polythene Pam."

Fifteen seconds after the medley and the album’s conclusion, there is a surprise treat, McCartney’s 22-second “Her Majesty,” which wound up on the record as an accident.

Jack Black and Kyle Gass, collectively known as Tenacious D, recently reimagined two of the songs in the medley, "You Never Give Me Your Money" and "The End," for acoustic guitars for a performance on SiriusXM's Octane Channel. Like everything with Tenacious D, it showed off the duo’s impressive musical chops as well as their fantastic sense of humor.

The truncated version of the medley was also a wonderful tribute to the incredible work the Beatles did 53 years ago.

Warning: This video contains NSFW language.

Firmbee/Canva

Google's 2022 Year in Search report shows what trended this year.

There's a lot you can tell about a person by their search history (unless they're a murder-mystery writer, in which case no one should jump to conclusions). And our search habits on the whole can tell us a lot about ourselves as a collective as well.

For better or for worse, what we look up on the internet is an indicator of what we care about, and Google's Year in Search report gives us some insight into what we cared about this past year.

There are reports for different countries as well as a global report. Let's start with what my fellow Americans looked up, shall we?

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