Chris Christie gave a moving speech on drug addiction, but here's what he failed to mention.

At a campaign stop in a New Hampshire tavern, New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie unloaded some heavy emotional artillery on the subject of drug addiction.

He shared a story about his mom, who started smoking when she was 16 years old.


GIFs via Huffington Post/YouTube.

She did everything she could to quit.

When she eventually developed lung cancer, the solution was obvious: Treat it.

He asked why people who are addicted to drugs don't receive the same compassion as those who get sick from cigarette addiction.

He shared another example to drive his point home. This one was about a friend of his from law school. Things always seemed to go his way. He was the smartest among them, the first to get a job offer, had lots of money and a loving wife and kids.

Then a minor running injury changed it all. His doctor prescribed him painkillers.

He was in and out of rehab for a decade, but his addiction was too strong.

He lost his wife, his kids, his home, his job, and his money. Then came a tragic ending.

Christie says policies shouldn't punish people with addictions. "We need to stop judging," he said, "and start giving them the tools they need to get better."

The speech was a touching break from the usual tussle of election season. But where will Christie stand when the rubber meets the road?

As a prosecutor, Christie built a "tough on crime" reputation. However, he has since acknowledged that the prison-crowding war on drugs was a failure.

Today, half of all federal prisoners are locked up for drug offenses. Christie says they need our help, not our judgment.

Full legend here. GIF via the Federal Bureau of Prisons.

“If we choose to stop treating the victims of addiction as enemies in a war," he said in a campaign speech, "we can end this war."

But here's where things get kinda weird.

If elected president, Christie has vowed to enforce federal cannabis prohibition laws, even in states that legalized medical and recreational use.

If that sounds at odds with what he had to say in that New Hampshire tavern, it's because it is. Walt Hickey of FiveThirtyEight says it's probably all about politics:

"Christie's intention may have been to assure the Republican base that the governor of a blue state with a medical cannabis policy is no friend of the reefer or just to shore up his law-and-order bona fides."

But Christie's stance on drug addiction wasn't the only moment of contrast with his other messaging. In the same speech, he says his pro-life beliefs are the basis for his compassionate views on the issue.

But that doesn't quite fit with his public support of the death penalty.

So is Christie really a "tell it like it is" candidate? That's for voters to decide.

In the meanwhile, prisons are swelling with folks who shouldn't be there, and tens of thousands are dying of drug overdoses every year because they can't get the treatment and opportunities they need.

And we'd all do well to remember that's just a fraction of what's at stake behind the clamor and confusion of politics.

Watch Christie's full speech:

Courtesy of Verizon
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If someone were to say "video games" to you, what are the first words that come to mind? Whatever words you thought of (fun, exciting, etc.), we're willing to guess "healthy" or "mental health tool" didn't pop into your mind.

And yet… it turns out they are. Especially for Veterans.

How? Well, for one thing, video games — and virtual reality more generally — are also more accessible and less stigmatized to veterans than mental health treatment. In fact, some psychiatrists are using virtual reality systems for this reason to treat PTSD.

Secondly, video games allow people to socialize in new ways with people who share common interests and goals. And for Veterans, many of whom leave the military feeling isolated or lonely after they lose the daily camaraderie of their regiment, that socialization is critical to their mental health. It gives them a virtual group of friends to talk with, connect to, and relate to through shared goals and interests.

In addition, according to a 2018 study, since many video games simulate real-life situations they encountered during their service, it makes socialization easier since they can relate to and find common ground with other gamers while playing.

This can help ease symptoms of depression, anxiety, and even PTSD in Veterans, which affects 20% of the Veterans who have served since 9/11.

Watch here as Verizon dives into the stories of three Veteran gamers to learn how video games helped them build community, deal with trauma and have some fun.

Band of Gamers www.youtube.com

Video games have been especially beneficial to Veterans since the beginning of the pandemic when all of us — Veterans included — have been even more isolated than ever before.

And that's why Verizon launched a challenge last year, which saw $30,000 donated to four military charities.

And this year, they're going even bigger by launching a new World of Warships charity tournament in partnership with Wargaming and Wounded Warrior Project called "Verizon Warrior Series." During the tournament, gamers will be able to interact with the game's iconic ships in new and exciting ways, all while giving back.

Together with these nonprofits, the tournament will welcome teams all across the nation in order to raise money for military charities helping Veterans in need. There will be a $100,000 prize pool donated to these charities, as well as donation drives for injured Veterans at every match during the tournament to raise extra funds.

Verizon is also providing special discounts to Those Who Serve communities, including military and first responders, and they're offering a $75 in-game content military promo for World of Warships.

Tournament finals are scheduled for August 8, so be sure to tune in to the tournament and donate if you can in order to give back to Veterans in need.

Courtesy of Verizon

Ready for the weekend? Of course, you are. Here's our weekly dose of good vibes to help you shed the stresses of the workweek and put yourself in a great frame of mind.

These 10 stories made us happy this week because they feature amazing creativity, generosity, and one super-cute fish.

1. Diver befriends a fish with the cutest smile

Hawaiian underwater photographer Yuki Nakano befriended a friendly porcupine fish and now they hang out regularly.

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