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Pop Culture

British kids try American cereal for the first time and are absolutely baffled

"Why would you want your milk to be pink?!"

cereal, best cereals, trix, capn crunch, froot loops, breakfast
JOLLY/YouTube

Not every cereal passed the taste test.

British high schoolers were asked to sample some of America’s most iconic cereals, and some of your favorites might not pass the worldwide taste test.

Author and culinary enthusiast Josh Carrott, who often invites people to try food of different cultures over on YouTube, introduced a handful of students—and their principal—to Lucky Charms, Trix, Cap’n Crunch, Froot Loops, Cinnamon Toast Crunch and Reese’s Puffs.You know, all the staples of American childhood.

Since these kids eat breakfast cereal on a regular basis, they couldn’t be that surprised by the new flavors, could they?

Yeah…no. British and American cereals are worlds apart, apparently.


“It looks like a bath bomb!” exclaimed a student named Rory after seeing the tiny marshmallow green clover in his bowl of Lucky Charms. (He’s not wrong).

“Why would you want your milk to be pink?!” asked Ricky, utterly confused as to why Trix would advertise such a thing. (Also, not wrong).

At this point, it’s mentioned that cereals in the UK don’t turn the milk different colors because the chemicals that do that are illegal in the country, since it can’t be ruled out that they cause genetic damage. Not America’s finest moment, but worth mentioning.

So no, colored milk did not impress. Nor did artificial fruit flavorings. Both Trix and Froot Loops got the lowest rankings, not to mention they left the group pretty flabbergasted.

“What even is the taste?” said headmaster Smith after one bite of Trix.

Even Reese’s Puffs failed to impress, despite many of the kids liking the candy. According to student Casey, it looked and tasted like “rabbit poo.”

Not to worry, not all American cereals failed! Both Cap’n Crunch and Cinnamon Toast Crunch, colorless as they are, got an enthusiastic stamp of approval. Goes to show that appearances don’t account for everything.

Americans are all too aware of the way many of our most popular food brands rely on obscene amounts of sugar, artificial chemicals and a well-marketed sense of nostalgia in order to sell products. But it’s still another thing to see how unappealing these kinds of food are to folks who haven’t really been exposed to them.

Regardless, it’s fun to watch how some of these stack up. And as the kid who enjoyed their Saturday morning cartoons with a tasty bowl of Cap’n Crunch, I personally felt vindicated for my superior taste buds.

Watch below:


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