Biden's new White House task force wants to take the politics out of science
via The White House / Flickr

The Biden administration has put a focus back on science, and for most Americans, it's a welcome return.

An Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research poll released on Monday found he has a 63% approval rating, bolstered primarily by his response to the COVID-19 pandemic.

Seventy-one percent of Americans, including 47% of Republicans, approve of how he has handled the pandemic.

The Biden administration has made huge efforts to communicate about the virus in a transparent, science-driven way, and made Herculean efforts to make the vaccine available to all adults. Whereas Trump chose to downplay the pandemic and spread misinformation.


Biden hopes to strengthen his administration's commitment to science even further through the help of a new 46-person federal scientific integrity task force. The task force includes members from more than two dozen government agencies.

The task force was created after a January 27 memo from Biden requiring "evidence-based policy-making."

The task force's primary focus is to find areas where partisanship has interfered with science over the last 12 years. It also looks to bolster the government's credibility in matters of science after the previous administration's hostile research that conflicted with its agenda.

The Trump administration was against the promotion of climate change research, notably scrubbing mentions of it from various Environmental Protection Agency websites.

And let's not forget about "Sharpiegate."

via Wikimedia Commons

"What we have seen in the last administration is that the suppression of science, the reassignment of scientists, the distortion of scientific information around climate change was not only destructive but counterproductive and really problematic," Jane Lubchenco, the deputy director for climate and environment at the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy, told the Los Angeles Times.

"There's little doubt that the American death toll from Covid-19 was far higher than it needed to be and that the administration's early unwillingness to take the issue seriously to listen to and act on the advice of experts and to communicate clearly contributed substantially to that death toll," Naomi Oreskes, a Harvard University historian who has written extensively on the politicization of science, told The Los Angeles Times.

"This is such a hopeful moment," says Rachel Cleetus, policy director of the Climate and Energy program at the Union of Concerned Scientists, told Scientific American. "We've seen this administration hit the ground running from day one. They have signaled very clearly a return to science-based policymaking and a commitment to center equity and justice in their policy missions."

The Biden administration's commitment to science shows that its primary goal is to create effective policy. It's also an important step in stopping Americans' eroding faith in government.

In 1970, 70% of Americans trusted the government a "great deal" or a "fair amount" when it came to domestic decision-making. In September 2020, it had declined to just 41%.

By bolstering the government's commitment to science, the Biden administration has an opportunity to enhance its credibility. Sure, that is of course good for the Biden administration. But it's arguably even better for American democracy in the long term. The government has a big hand in protecting the safety and economic well-being of all Americans. Improving the public's faith in the institution an important step in creating an even more stable, free, and prosperous society.

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Macy's and Girls Inc. believe that all girls deserve to be safe, supported, and valued. However, racial disparities continue to exist for young people when it comes to education levels, employment, and opportunities for growth. Add to that the gender divide, and it's clear to see why it's important for girls of color to have access to mentors who can equip them with the tools needed to navigate gender, economic, and social barriers.

Anissa Rivera is one of those mentors. Rivera is a recent Program Manager at the Long Island affiliate of Girls Inc., a nonprofit focusing on the holistic development of girls ages 5-18. The goal of the organization is to provide a safe space for girls to develop long-lasting mentoring relationships and build the skills, knowledge, and attitudes to thrive now and as adults.

Rivera spent years of her career working within the themes of self and community empowerment with young people — encouraging them to tap into their full potential. Her passion for youth development and female empowerment eventually led her to Girls Inc., where she served as an agent of positive change helping to inspire all girls to be strong, smart, and bold.

Photo courtesy of Macy's

Inspiring young women from all backgrounds is why Macy's has continued to partner with Girls Inc. for the second year in a row. The partnership will support mentoring programming that offers girls career readiness, college preparation, financial literacy, and more. Last year, Macy's raised over $1.3M for Girls Inc. in support of this program along with their Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math (STEM) programming for more than 26,000 girls. Studies show that girls who participated are more likely than their peers to enjoy math and science, score higher on standardized math tests, and be more equipped for college and campus life.

Thanks to mentors like Rivera, girls across the country have the tools they need to excel in school and the confidence to change the world. With your help, we can give even more girls the opportunity to rise up. Throughout September 2021, customers can round up their in-store purchases or donate online to support Girls Inc. at Macys.com/MacysGives.

Who runs the world? Girls!

Screenshots via @castrowas95/Twitter

In the Pacific Northwest, orca sightings are a fairly common occurrence. Still, tourists and locals alike marvel when a pod of "sea pandas" swim by, whipping out their phones to capture some of nature's most beautiful and intelligent creatures in their natural habitat.

While orcas aren't a threat to humans, there's a reason they're called "killer whales." To their prey, which includes just about everything that swims except humans, they are terrifying apex predators who hunt in packs and will even coordinate to attack whales several times their own size.

So if you're a human alone on a little platform boat, and a sea lion that a group of orcas was eyeing for lunch jumps onto your boat, you might feel a little wary. Especially when those orcas don't just swim on by, but surround you head-on.

Watch exactly that scenario play out (language warning, if you've got wee ones you don't want f-bombed):

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